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What did you do today in pyro?


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#1161 starxplor

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Posted 09 July 2018 - 11:18 PM

Finished my first drying screen. Designed to have space to hold items that may roll around, as well as height to stack and still have airflow. Eventually will have a drying box to put multiple of these in, and they are designed to be removed vertically with room for hands to grab the vertical bits.

 

Cut the wood at my local hacker space, sealed with spar urethane to hopefully last a while, screen is cut out from an old screen door that had been sliced and was no longer useful as a door.

 

Attached File  IMG_20180709_210449.jpg   170.05KB   0 downloads


Edited by starxplor, 09 July 2018 - 11:20 PM.


#1162 Mumbles

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 01:17 AM

I never had much luck with nylon screen.  It's too stretchy.  I prefer aluminum for screens personally.  Also as a tip, for heavy items using a 1x1 welded screen underneath can help to reinforce the screen strength.  It also helps with large, finer mesh screens to keep them from warping.  


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#1163 lloyd

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 05:20 AM

I'm averse to using aluminum for anything that might touch damp pyro.  I agree that nylon window screen is not strong-enough by itself, so we underlay that with either 1/2" galvanized wire cloth (cheap, easily-replaceable), or with 1" plastic lattice.  One can find the wire cloth at any decent hardware store.  I honestly do not remember where we found the plastic lattice.  It lasts so long, we've not yet had to replace any of it in nearly 20 years.

 

We have a couple of drying screens in our star production area that are under-laid with stainless steel wire cloth.  That's pretty darned expensive, but is essentially a "one-time expense", since it never goes bad.

 

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#1164 starxplor

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 09:39 PM

This is the first woodworking I have done in 24 years so I didn't want to buy any sort of screen given the chances of screwing this up.

Something like this? https://www.mcmaster...220t72/=1dnsg7z

 

The pictured screen above has an interior screen area of roughly 1ft x 1.75ft (the short wood pieces are 1ft long and the the long wood pieces are 2ft, the wood is 0.75in x 1.5in)

 

Is there a way to attach the steel screen to the nylon, or better to fold the ends and attach them to the wood on the sides?



#1165 OldMarine

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 10:06 PM

I built mine according to the Skylighter and FW tutorials which were both by Ned.

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#1166 starxplor

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Posted 10 July 2018 - 10:27 PM

OM: that looks like the screen is built in to the frame. This is what I have with the nylon screen and was asking about the idea of reinforcing that screen that is already completed with a galvanised screen.

 

Additionally, can a galvanised screen be used on its own and not react badly to the wet chems? (thinking about future screens)



#1167 Ubehage

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 07:22 AM

OM: that looks like the screen is built in to the frame. This is what I have with the nylon screen and was asking about the idea of reinforcing that screen that is already completed with a galvanised screen.

 

Additionally, can a galvanised screen be used on its own and not react badly to the wet chems? (thinking about future screens)

I'm not quite sure. I think I remember reading about using stainless steel or aluminum. Galvanised metals may corrode and/or react with wet materials.


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#1168 Baldor

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 10:00 AM

Playing with e-matches.

 

Prototiped half this in perfboard, and testing with 1cm of 0.1mm nicrome.

 

Attached File  table schematics.PNG   61.11KB   1 downloads



#1169 starxplor

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 09:21 PM

I'm not quite sure. I think I remember reading about using stainless steel or aluminum. Galvanised metals may corrode and/or react with wet materials.

 

Lloyd had mentioned using galvanised steel, which is why I mentioned it. Just wondering if this screen is reinforceable, or if I need to scrap it and make entirely new ones

 

 

 

Playing with e-matches.

 

Prototiped half this in perfboard, and testing with 1cm of 0.1mm nicrome.

 

attachicon.giftable schematics.PNG

 

One thing I found in trying to build my own was if you have the same power source for continuity testing as you do for firing, make sure you have enough energy to first a cue while all of the cues in your system are testing continuity, unless you disable continuity in fire mode.


Edited by starxplor, 12 July 2018 - 09:25 PM.


#1170 lloyd

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 05:12 AM

Starxplor,

 

Please note I only suggested galvanized wire cloth as an underpinning for plastic-coated fiberglass screening, and only for use as 'drying screens'.  We would never use that material for mixing screens.  All of our mixing screens were constructed of 316SS woven wire.

 

Lloyd


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#1171 OldMarine

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 07:57 PM

OM: that looks like the screen is built in to the frame. This is what I have with the nylon screen and was asking about the idea of reinforcing that screen that is already completed with a galvanised screen.
 
Additionally, can a galvanised screen be used on its own and not react badly to the wet chems? (thinking about future screens)


Galvanized and aluminum react badly with oxidizes. I'd use only stainless for screens. I tried brass and it didn't last long at all.

Edited by OldMarine, 13 July 2018 - 07:58 PM.

Come on! Name one other hobby in which you cheer as your money and hard work go up in smoke!

#1172 lloyd

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Posted 14 July 2018 - 04:34 AM

I think something is being missed, here.

 

We use plastic screening over galvanized mesh reinforcement, and the screens last for a decade or more of daily production use.

 

There is a 'trick' in that.  WET comps or stars go onto PAPER in the screens.  We use cheap 30lb or 50lb recycled kraft for 'drying papers', and large enough sheets so that we can tuck the corners, forming a full 'tub' of paper in the screen frame.  No wet comp ever comes directly into contact with either the screening or the wooden frame.  

 

We don't put any material directly on the screens until it's approximately dry to the touch.  After that, the open screening accelerates the final drying process.

 

Finally, we either wash and dry or thoroughly brush the screens clean before storing or re-using them.

 

Lloyd


Edited by lloyd, 14 July 2018 - 04:36 AM.

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