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Guinness world record attempt 60 inch shell


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#41 Niladmirari

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 04:38 AM

500/5000 = 1/10 ?

By the rule for big shells (more 20lb): 1lb - 0,5 ounce BP. Right? 5000lbs shell - 150lbs BP.

 

Important question - what size do granules BP?


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#42 Niladmirari

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 05:00 AM

Let's call this shell 5000lb that means we need about 500lb of BP to lift the shell . I see a crater in the future ....

No crater. We do mortar start Satana rocket. Her weight 211000 kg (468888lbs). Height lift 20-30 meters. Imagine how much BP...

 


Edited by Niladmirari, 06 April 2014 - 07:01 AM.

"We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard". John F. Kennedy

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#43 MrB

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 09:30 PM

500/5000 = 1/10 ?

By the rule for big shells (more 20lb): 1lb - 0,5 ounce BP. Right? 5000lbs shell - 150lbs BP.

 

Important question - what size do granules BP?

To make loading, and handling somewhat manageable, i'd say something like a mix of ping pong & tennis-ball size. Ok, so in reality, i have no idea, i just wanna see that size "granuals" test burn... It would look like anthracite coal if graphite treated, and imagine the shock if someone tried to light it in their stove...

 

No crater. We do mortar start Satana rocket. Her weight 211000 kg (468888lbs). Height lift 20-30 meters. Imagine how much BP...

 

That launch is fookin amazing. I'm pretty sure they aren't using BP to launch it with, there just has to be better stuff for that size tubes, to be honest. Google wasn't helpful, and that dude knows everything, so my Googlefu is apparently weak.

Oh well.

Launching rockets like that is supposedly how most early missile system did, it's just on a huge scale. I must say, awesome.

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#44 bob

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 03:42 PM

Perhaps we pyros should go together and get some of these self propelled rocket launchers for lifting shells :)

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#45 nlrfly

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 02:13 AM

I think there could be legal challenges to air dropping shells... mostly it's against the law to carry explosives on a plane. Might be easier to cooperate with the military on this matter and drop it from a military aircraft. An altimeter would be needed to be installed on the shell so that it bursts at a precise altitude.

give FIFI something to do. http://www.youtube.c...h?v=qG-cTxPdYbs



#46 Peret

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 02:01 AM

Applying the 100 feet per inch rule, this shell will have to go to 6000 feet. Ignoring for the moment air resistance, that means it has to be rising for about 20 seconds, from which we can calculate the required muzzle velocity as about 620 ft/sec. Allowing for air resistance, a finger in the air estimate says that velocity had better be more like 900 ft/sec.

 

Checking with ancient books by people who understood gunpowder, I see that the 1860 Armstrong 20 pounder achieved 1100 ft/sec with 2.5 pounds of powder, while the 100 pounder did it with 12 pounds. It could probably have managed 900 ft/sec with 10 pounds, that is, 10% of the projectile weight. So, depending how heavy the shell turns out, 500 pounds of powder is not out of the question. But it won't be 2FA. The big guns of old used powder pressed into hexagonal prisms 1 to 2 inches across (depending on caliber) and the same long, with a core up the middle, that burned more like a rocket engine than a firecracker. A finer grain powder in that quantity would have burned too fast and burst the breech. The slow burn, though, needs a long barrel, like 20 calibers, or 100 feet in the case of this shell.

 

It will for sure be a sight to see it launched if it eventually gets made, but I have serious doubts that it's practical.

 






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