Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Horsetail firework effect

Horsetail fireworks

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Liftanddeafen

Liftanddeafen

    Playing with fire

  • Full Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 20 October 2013 - 02:18 PM

Hello, I've seen quite a few of these "horsetail" effect fireworks where the firework bearly breaks and spills out a fantastic effect where the stars just sag down mostly using charcoal compositions by the look of them. If anyone could give me an insight on how there made it would be greatly appreciated.

Will

#2 ollie1016

ollie1016

    Pyrotechnician

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 206 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Everywhere...
  • Interests:Quad bikes, building stuff, pyro..., mechanics

Posted 21 October 2013 - 02:02 AM

I think you are talking about comets.

#3 Nessalco

Nessalco

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator - HE
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 472 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Vermont
  • Interests:Pyro, high power hybrid rockets, local government

Posted 21 October 2013 - 02:52 AM

Hello, I've seen quite a few of these "horsetail" effect fireworks where the firework bearly breaks and spills out a fantastic effect where the stars just sag down mostly using charcoal compositions by the look of them. If anyone could give me an insight on how there made it would be greatly appreciated.

Will

I believe they are a simple can shell with very little containment, made to break in such a way they 'pop the lid' and the lit stars are projected very gently all in one direction. I've purchased consumer fireworks with the effect and like it very much - I'll be trying some 3 and 4 inch versions over the winter.

 

Kevin


There are two ways of exerting one's strength: one is pushing down, the other is pulling up. - Booker T. Washington
 

#4 Mumbles

Mumbles

    Grandmaster

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,331 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Above You

Posted 21 October 2013 - 09:21 AM

While I've made this effect, it was never on purpose.  :)  I've seen them in both canister and ball shell varieties.  The trick, as Kevin said, is to use a weak bursting charge, and poor confinement.  Ball shells use only enough pasting to hold it together (maybe 3-4 layers), and a weak bursting charge.  I've been lead to believe that well primed stars can serve as their own burst.  I'd still add some granular BP or a small burst bag just to be sure. 

 

Cylinder shells are also not very difficult.  They're described in The Westech Fireworks Manual, if you have that.  Essentially they can be built kind of like an aerial mine.  The fused end of the shell is filled with burst.  I've seen both bags of granular BP, as well as just BP on hulls entirely filling one end.  Then the stars are placed on top of the burst, and the shell is closed up like normal.  When spiking the shell, I believe the verticals are done as normal, but the horizontal pattern is different.  Horizontal spiking is done heavily over the burst area, and very lightly over the star area.  If you've ever spiked a shell containing insert shells, I suspect about that amount of density is right.  I've also read about some people cutting every other vertical.  The idea really is to make an intentional break out one end. 

 

I prefer the canister shell version personally, and for once it doesn't have anything to do with my general bias toward cylinders.  Ball shell versions sort of just pop out and rely on either being broken on the way up, or being fired at an angle.  The cylinder shell versions sort of shoot the stars out to one side.  It is a quite impressive effect when fired in volley.  I just like the extra effect of being propelled out in some direction.  It just adds something to it. 


Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

The sky is my canvas, and I have 2,113 pounds of powdered paint in the workshop.

#5 Liftanddeafen

Liftanddeafen

    Playing with fire

  • Full Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 21 October 2013 - 10:41 AM

Thank you for the replies. I like the idea of a weak spiking at one end it seems simple enough to do. I might have to try this put. Is there any specific compositions you recommend to do it with? As I would like the core star to be veline green as I think a slow burning willow composition will look beautiful with a green core

#6 Seymour

Seymour

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator - HE
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 936 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Zealand

Posted 21 October 2013 - 05:30 PM

Mumbles summed it up very well. I have used the prime on the stars only on a few occasions, but I usually add a gram or two of BP grain. Two layers of pasted paper is typical for me. Just enough to make me feel comfortable having it come out of the mortar intact.

 

One thing I'd like to emphasise is that the effect is best in my opinion if the shells break on the way up and arc over. This can be achieved of course using shorter timefuse and/or more lift.

 

 

Skip to 25 secs to see my horsetail. It could have been popped a second earlier, but if you look carefully you see the stars curving towards, or away from the camera as they arc over.

 

Obviously this effect looks best with long tailed streamer stars. I think I used a slight variant of 'slow gold' in this shell.

 

Mumbles probably has a very good point about canisters, but this was a 4" ball.


Edited by Seymour, 21 October 2013 - 05:31 PM.

  • braddsn likes this

#7 rallekralle11

rallekralle11

    Smelt the smoke

  • Full Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:35 AM

i think i had a firework cake that looked kinda like that once...


I'm SWEDISH

 

så... vem bryr sej om det da?






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Horsetail, fireworks

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users