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Potassium donator for KClO3


Nikko

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I am having a though time finding KCl, with which to make KClO3.

 

Could I use NaCl and K2SO4 in solution? I know that I would end up with a lot of NaClO3, but I'm pretty confident in my ability to wash it.

 

In the meantime, though, I will continue searching for KCl. I know a supermarket *somewhere* near me sells 50/50 KCl and NaCl, but I can't for the life of me remember which one, for one, and I do remember it was overpriced, for two.

 

Thanks,

Nikko

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How are you thinking about ending up with NaCLO3 in a double replacement reaction with NaCl and K2SO4? Edited by mathiasxx94
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If you can't obtain potassium chloride, you might be better off just electrolyzing sodium chloride to the chlorate, and then precipitating it out after the run. Potassium chloride is of course the preferred source so that the electrolyte can be recycled, but most anything will do.

 

I would look elsewhere than the supermarket. Generally bulk sources are preferred for price. You can sometimes find it as a salt used for water softeners, as a fertilizer (muriate of potash), or as veterinarian supplements. The last two will tend to also come in smaller packages of 2-5kg if you don't want to commit to a full bag.

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KCl is harder to find than NaCl. KCl can be found as some of the "potash" fertiliser or animal feed supplements. Buy whatever quantity comes to you -it's not the simplest of chems to find.
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Do you have snow where you live? It is used to melt snow from roads and sidewalks. If so might find it at the hardware store. Which you should check anyways for water softener. Even my grocery store carries it for water softener. Sodium chloride is more popular but they carry the potassium as well. Not sure how much is left in the water but maybe it is for people that can't have any sodium in their diet? Probably not unless you drink a lot of water. Here it is about 20 bucks for a 50 lb bag.
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I'm in Aussie, so most chems are harder to get here than you might expect. I just found an Aussie online supplier that sells it at $30 per 5 kilo bag.... bit rich for me...

 

Please Bunnings, Come to my aid...

 

[EDIT]Screw you too, Bunnings

I found an agricultural supplier that sells it, big question is if they sell to individuals, or if you have to buy by the tonne.

I sent them an email anyway, I'll post the results to (hopefully) benefit the wider AussiePyro public.

[/EDIT]

Edited by Nikko
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The farm grade stuff is mixed with some red stuff, no idea what they are and why they are there... wonder if its to make pyro harder. Thankfully they are insoluble so you can wash them off or filter it out. It just takes a long time and a lot of filter.
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To be fair HIS farm grade has red insoluble stuff added. This is something I've never seen in the US before, and actually never heard of anywhere else for that matter. It is not a standard product across the world. Guaranteed it's not to make practicing pyrotechnics more difficult.
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