Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Brocade Stars


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Mumbles

Mumbles

    Grandmaster

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,231 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Above You

Posted 14 February 2012 - 01:27 PM

I often get requests for the brocade formula I use. I would say it's my formula, but I developed it right back into a very common formula. It took me the better part of two years to rediscover Chrysanthemum 8 :) The formula below is pretty close to Chrysanthemum 8 plus the metals. It's about where I want it. I milled the nitrate, airfloat charcoal, and sulfur for about 30 minutes only because my nitrate is coarse. Dextrin would probably work fine too.

KNO3 - 45.5%
C (airfloat) - 26.5%
C (80 mesh) - 10%
Sulfur - 6%
SGRS - 6%
Titanium (-30+60 mesh) - 3%
Aluminum (-20 mesh flitters) - 3%


Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

The sky is my canvas, and I have 2,113 pounds of powdered paint in the workshop.

#2 allrocketspsl

allrocketspsl

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 687 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:florida

Posted 14 February 2012 - 01:48 PM

I often get requests for the brocade formula I use. I would say it's my formula, but I developed it right back into a very common formula. It took me the better part of two years to rediscover Chrysanthemum 8 :) The formula below is pretty close to Chrysanthemum 8 plus the metals. It's about where I want it. I milled the nitrate, airfloat charcoal, and sulfur for about 30 minutes only because my nitrate is coarse. Dextrin would probably work fine too.

KNO3 - 45.5%
C (airfloat) - 26.5%
C (80 mesh) - 10%
Sulfur - 6%
SGRS - 6%
Titanium (-30+60 mesh) - 3%
Aluminum (-20 mesh flitters) - 3%

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=_HRYwJEJqDk



ok if i copy the comp for my next 4" hemi on 3lb rocket

#3 allrocketspsl

allrocketspsl

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 687 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:florida

Posted 14 February 2012 - 01:49 PM

I often get requests for the brocade formula I use. I would say it's my formula, but I developed it right back into a very common formula. It took me the better part of two years to rediscover Chrysanthemum 8 :) The formula below is pretty close to Chrysanthemum 8 plus the metals. It's about where I want it. I milled the nitrate, airfloat charcoal, and sulfur for about 30 minutes only because my nitrate is coarse. Dextrin would probably work fine too.

KNO3 - 45.5%
C (airfloat) - 26.5%
C (80 mesh) - 10%
Sulfur - 6%
SGRS - 6%
Titanium (-30+60 mesh) - 3%
Aluminum (-20 mesh flitters) - 3%

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=_HRYwJEJqDk


awesome mate!

#4 dagabu

dagabu

    Grandmaster

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,432 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Up Nort

Posted 14 February 2012 - 01:51 PM

They are beautiful Mum!

-dag
Dave
 
PGI Member http://www.pgi.org
IPA Member http://www.iowapyro.com
 
"The art of fire is indeed the supreme art; for fire is at once the universal slave, the universal master."

#5 Potassiumchlorate

Potassiumchlorate

    Firebreather

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,500 posts

Posted 14 February 2012 - 02:54 PM

Very, very nice, Mumbles! :)
"This salt, formerly called hyperoxymuriate of potassa, is used for sundry preparations, and especially for experimental fire-works." Dr. James Cutbush

Conflo, ergo sum

#6 warthog

warthog

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator - HE
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 621 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Limbo, USA
  • Interests:Vestibulum ante faciem Dei

Posted 14 February 2012 - 04:22 PM

Thanks! Mumbles I have oft admired these while watching your videos.

when you mention Dex, is this for a binder then replacing the SGRS? Do you typically roll these?

any particular type of charcoal or are you just using commercial?

Edited by warthog, 14 February 2012 - 04:27 PM.

מרן אתא
If you confess with your mouth, "Jesus is Lord" and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead you will be saved. For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you confess and are saved. (Romans 10:9-10).

PGI Member
This post represents my 2 alone.

#7 Mumbles

Mumbles

    Grandmaster

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,231 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Above You

Posted 14 February 2012 - 05:03 PM

By all means allrockets. I wouldn't have posted it if I didn't want people using it. Rockets are probably a fairly good spot for them. As you can see from the video they have some hangtime. If someone wanted to use this in smaller shells, I'd suggest using a finer cut of coarse Al. That's what lingers so long. Maybe try screening it through a 40 or 50 mesh screen first?

I did mean that Dextrin should work in place of the SGRS. I mostly make cylindrical shells, so I mostly make cut stars. I've been slow to admit that cut stars just look crappy in ball shells. Compositions with Al flitters can be tricky to roll. If you want to give it a shot, please let me know how it goes. It will probably go best with toro. If you want to try to roll it up with dry powder and a spray bottle, I've heard you really want to start with cores over 1/4". The words used to describe how unpleasant rolling comps like this starting from small cores probably shouldn't be mentioned here.

Yes, I just use generic commercial charcoal. Both for the airfloat and the -80 mesh. Other charcoals may give a different or more pleasing result. I stick with what's cheap, available, and easy. (probably not the best comment to be making on Valentine's Day :D )
Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

The sky is my canvas, and I have 2,113 pounds of powdered paint in the workshop.

#8 warthog

warthog

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator - HE
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 621 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Limbo, USA
  • Interests:Vestibulum ante faciem Dei

Posted 14 February 2012 - 08:05 PM

Perfect! I am not likely to be rolling these but I am sure to pump them. I tend to pump my stars. I thought that pumped stars were also good for cylinder shells. Not doubt about it though, cutting stars is the fastest and easiest way to make stars IMO. So I can understand using these most of the time for this reason as well. I just have a sort of fascination for making those nice little cylindrical pellets with a pump or star plate.
מרן אתא
If you confess with your mouth, "Jesus is Lord" and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead you will be saved. For it is with your heart that you believe and are justified, and it is with your mouth that you confess and are saved. (Romans 10:9-10).

PGI Member
This post represents my 2 alone.

#9 californiapyro

californiapyro

    Pyrotechnician

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 681 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:cali
  • Interests:metalwork, pyrotechnics, rocketry, tooling

Posted 15 February 2012 - 12:00 AM

i love those little perfect pellets. they make me happy :)
www.fireworktools.com

Check it out! Quality tooling at an affordable price

#10 starseeker

starseeker

    Playing with fire

  • Full Member
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:united kingdom
  • Interests:shooting,motorcycling,outside cooking,all things pyro,the great outdoors.

Posted 15 February 2012 - 03:58 PM

Rolling or cutting charcoal based stars can be a bit of a pita sometimes,roll them and they look bumpy,cut them and the patty is either too wet and the cuts flow into each other or too dry and its a job to roll the patty out, i certainly find the star plate method the quickest and easiest.

#11 moondogman

moondogman

    Pyromaniac

  • HE Qualified
  • PipPipPip
  • 158 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:gardening hunting motorcycling Beer

Posted 15 February 2012 - 06:13 PM

What is the difference between brocade and willow diadem? They look very similar to me?

Steve

#12 MikeB

MikeB

    Pyromaniac

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 10:49 PM

What is the difference between brocade and willow diadem? They look very similar to me?

Steve


The brocade effect is typically of a shorter duration and has a fine lacey silver or gold appearance. A true willow is a long lasting and drooping effect most typically of the charcoal type. It can be variegated though with the inclusion of metals. Diadem refers to a crown and a willow diadem is a willow ending with colored jewels.
Heartland Pyrotechnic Arts
http://www.heartland.../</span></span>

#13 dagabu

dagabu

    Grandmaster

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,432 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Up Nort

Posted 16 February 2012 - 08:58 AM

The brocade effect is typically of a shorter duration and has a fine lacey silver or gold appearance. A true willow is a long lasting and drooping effect most typically of the charcoal type. It can be variegated though with the inclusion of metals. Diadem refers to a crown and a willow diadem is a willow ending with colored jewels.


Thanks Mike, that was a very nice explanation to an often asked question. Does diadem have to end with jewels even if not a willow diadem?

-dag
Dave
 
PGI Member http://www.pgi.org
IPA Member http://www.iowapyro.com
 
"The art of fire is indeed the supreme art; for fire is at once the universal slave, the universal master."

#14 Mumbles

Mumbles

    Grandmaster

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,231 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Above You

Posted 20 February 2012 - 03:42 AM

I've never been a fan of the name given to that Independence Fireworks formula. I'm sure it's not quite right, but I've always differentiated willows from brocades in my mind as willows being pure charcoal, and brocades being metalized willows. The etymology makes it out to be an embossed or elaborated cloth. http://www.etymonlin...hp?term=brocade I've associated that with an embossed or elaborated tail. IE something additional to the tail. I guess you could make the same arguements about calling a glitter or firefly a brocade as well. There probably isn't a perfectly correct answer.

In relation to needed a "jewel", I'd say a diadem needs that. One without would just be a crown willow or crown crysanthemum. I know a lot of these things are laid out in the PGI competition rule book, but I'm sure there is a different source.
Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

The sky is my canvas, and I have 2,113 pounds of powdered paint in the workshop.

#15 dagabu

dagabu

    Grandmaster

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,432 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Up Nort

Posted 20 February 2012 - 10:13 AM

In relation to needed a "jewel", I'd say a diadem needs that. One without would just be a crown willow or crown crysanthemum. I know a lot of these things are laid out in the PGI competition rule book, but I'm sure there is a different source.


Thanks for the explanation Mum, it's hard to really get a picture of any one effect when others use the wrong name (myself included) for them. My wife would like to be a PGI judge some day but I am confused with all the nomenclature.

-dag
Dave
 
PGI Member http://www.pgi.org
IPA Member http://www.iowapyro.com
 
"The art of fire is indeed the supreme art; for fire is at once the universal slave, the universal master."

#16 Yus

Yus

    Playing with fire

  • Full Member
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts

Posted 11 February 2018 - 03:00 AM

Brocade Star Tests. Compositions are under video.

 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users