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Spanish kamuro loose powder not burning


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#1 redbullzuiper

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 03:31 PM

Hi guys,

Hope all of you are well, it has been a while ive posted :)

I have a little problem. I made 500g batch of the spanish kamuro formula.

KNO3 29
Sulfur 5
C (beech) 41
FeTi 250 mic. 15
Dextrin 6

I ball milled all the ingredients for 1 hour, with the exception of the Titanium.

After it had been milled I tried to burn a small portion (3 gram) loose powder to check its burn rate. However, it didnt burn at all.

Any of you have any idea what could be wrong with it?

The used potassium should be fine. Made lots of other compositions with it just fine, like black powder.

The used charcoal is pine.

Regards

Edited by redbullzuiper, 16 October 2021 - 03:36 PM.

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#2 snapper

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Posted 16 October 2021 - 06:48 PM

pump or cut it into stars then try it from a star gun primed with home powder



#3 redbullzuiper

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 01:21 AM

Hm, I rolled alot of stars from it. I hope its going to work :/


Edited by redbullzuiper, 17 October 2021 - 01:24 AM.


#4 pyrokid

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 08:23 AM

In my experience, many charcoal-nitrate compositions burn faster after processing with water. In the context of charcoal streamer stars, I suspect that being bound into a solid mass with an aqueous process mediates better heat transfer from the burning into the unburnt composition, thus facilitating better combustion. We must also remember that a star falling through the air is supplied with more atmospheric oxygen compared to a stationary star or pile of composition.

#5 redbullzuiper

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 02:40 PM

In my experience, many charcoal-nitrate compositions burn faster after processing with water. In the context of charcoal streamer stars, I suspect that being bound into a solid mass with an aqueous process mediates better heat transfer from the burning into the unburnt composition, thus facilitating better combustion. We must also remember that a star falling through the air is supplied with more atmospheric oxygen compared to a stationary star or pile of composition.

 

I hope so, I rolled 12mm stars from it, I bet (if they burn) they burn too long, so they would hit the ground. Maybe I use them as rising tails. They are currently in the dryingbox, can test them hopefully next week in a star mine.



#6 Maserface

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Posted 17 October 2021 - 07:38 PM

At a glance that is extremely fuel heavy, formulas like this are usually required to be moving through the air to sustain combustion (a trade off for having full long duration tails). Try it in the air and let us know.

#7 redbullzuiper

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Posted 20 October 2021 - 04:32 PM

At a glance that is extremely fuel heavy, formulas like this are usually required to be moving through the air to sustain combustion (a trade off for having full long duration tails). Try it in the air and let us know.

 

I tried them today in a star mine, they are perfect. I am positively surprised, they burn and at the perfect rate aswell. They burn long but not too long. I rolled them for 4" shells, so they will not hit the ground still burning if I shoot them at the propper height.






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