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Need help! Sponenburgh clumping/ 100gs in 4 gs out


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#1 SignalKanboom

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 12:45 PM

I have a pvc mill jar and because it uses the pvc caps there are gaps, or creases for powder to go in. All of my powder clumps and sticks to the sides and in these creases. Im going crazy with killing, I cannot seem to be successful no matter what. I feel like Im just poisoning myself with lead by having to start over and clean the jar out.

#2 Ionforbes

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 12:53 PM

What are you milling? BP shouldn't clump but if you're milling saltpetre on its own then you might need to add a very small amount of anti-caking agent.



#3 SharkWhisperer

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 01:00 PM

Already addressed, in detail, in "Blackmatch" thread immediately below this one...



#4 BetICouldMake1

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 01:41 PM

I'll respond here in the hopes of keeping the BM thread vaguely on topic. 

 

Moisture is known to cause clumping while milling but usually this means an agglomeration of the ingredients, the powder sticks to itself and forms a big ball or a lump in a corner of the mill.

 

How long are you milling? I live in a very humid climate and do not pre dry my chems before milling and have only had issues with clumping if I mill for extended periods of time, 3+ hours in my case. But I do use rubber lined jars which helps mitigate clumping issues. 

 

I'm also wondering if there may be a level of static cling happening. Sulfur, at least the stuff I have, is very prone to clumping and very susceptible to static. 

 

Are you getting lots of hard lumps or just lots of comp sticking to your media/jar? 

 

You mention washing your jar and media. Making sure those are thoroughly dry is also important. 

 

Lead is only dangerous if it's inside you. Don't eat it, don't breathe the dust, (don't get shot) and you'll be fine. I know gloves might be hard to come by given the Covid situation, but you should still be able to find a cheap pair of dish gloves, or even some rubber coated fabric gloves like those used by mechanics or gardeners. If your hands are stained or hard to clean I'm guessing it's probably charcoal and not lead. Charcoal loves to work its way into the nooks and crannies of any damn thing. 


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#5 SignalKanboom

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 05:40 PM

Thanks Betl, it is definitely just sticking all over the jar. I wear gloves but they get old real quick when trying to do things. Plus, Im a fiddler, I would go through 100 pairs in a few hours with how often I check on and mess with.

#6 SharkWhisperer

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 06:18 PM

Thanks Betl, it is definitely just sticking all over the jar. I wear gloves but they get old real quick when trying to do things. Plus, Im a fiddler, I would go through 100 pairs in a few hours with how often I check on and mess with.

The 7 mil, or even 9 mil nitrile gloves will hold up a lot longer than the typical 5 mil nitrile (or any cheapo vinyl). If using disposables, that is. The 5 mil last me for most comp handling, but if I'm granulating something or using something more toxic than others (barium...) then I go heavier. Granulating is almost guaranteed to rip a few fingers with my technique.

 

No glove shortage in 3 different regions of the USA that I've been to in the last month, but hit-or-miss getting isopropyl or acetone at usual prices. 91% isopropyl used to be $2.50/quart (small liter) before covid at Wallyworld. Acetone was a buck for 8 ounces ($4/quart (small liter)) at the dollar store. Now little isopropy on shelves at Walmare (overpriced 70% at CVS though). Dollar store still available but stealth-dropped size to 6 oz during trade battles. Have seen isopropyl and denatured alcohol, and acetone, at Home Depot for about twice those prices. 

 

Getting off topic....

 

Try to get some thicker gloves, hah ha!!!



#7 SignalKanboom

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Posted 11 October 2020 - 07:01 PM

Will do, I normally have some, but have been trying to stay pretty lean on funds. Gloves are expensive( the good ones )

#8 Arthur

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Posted 12 October 2020 - 12:11 AM

The usual reason for clumping is water. Charcoal holds onto storage dampness and may contain 20% water without showing signs -til you mill it.

 

Beware also that charcoal absorbs water but sulphur does not so damp ingredients will skew the ratio of ingredients in a mix -usually causing failure.



#9 SignalKanboom

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 09:58 PM

I got it under control! I bought a toaster over for drying.




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