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Question about recreating some stars

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#1 yannismanesis

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Posted 13 April 2020 - 05:23 PM

Recently, I stumbled upon this video, and I would really like to recreate this kind of stars. Is it just charcoal with added relatively fine Al or is it a full on glitter? Or is there even a similar composition available? Any info would be more than acceptable. Thanks in advance. The video is below:

 

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=JzGlY9ZwiWI


花火


#2 LiamPyro

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Posted 15 August 2020 - 01:53 PM

Looks quite similar to Willow Diadem, although more glittery. 

 

Willow Diadem:

percent parts component

39.17% 66 Charcoal (Airfloat)
31.16% 52.5 Potassium Nitrate
10.68% 18 Sulfur
7.12% 12 Dextrin
4.45% 7.5 FerroTitanium (30-60 mesh)
4.45% 7.5 FerroTitanium (40-325 mesh)
2.97% 5 Titanium (sponge, 40-80 mesh)

I've made these stars in the past and loved 'em. Attached below is a video of my 5/16" pumped stars in a 3" ball shell. It should be noted that I didn't use multiple grades of FeTi as specified, and the Ti was spherical and of a finer mesh. Still turned out great, however. This isn't exactly the same effect as in the video you posted but it's pretty close and equally cool in my opinion.

 

Attached File  chat-media-video-A9527C92-342B-432F-AAAC-47C1320E620B.MOV   6.08MB   44 downloads

 

Ignore the retard in the background and alarm noise, lol. 


Edited by LiamPyro, 15 August 2020 - 02:02 PM.


#3 Blackmach

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Posted 19 August 2020 - 02:46 PM

I have a star of this effect from a shell shot by me. examining by eye and burning some pieces of a star on the ground, the metal is undoubtedly titanium, but apparently it has some chemical that makes a glitter effect such as antimony trisulfide. I would have to do some tests to find out.

#4 Blackmach

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Posted 20 August 2020 - 12:41 AM

To a willow formula add 8-9% antimony trisulfide and 5% approx Ti 250m and see what happens, the formula should not be too far ...

#5 skysparkler

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Posted 01 November 2020 - 09:16 AM

Looks like flashing titanium; effect name ''Corolla''  . some titanium dust granulated trougth 120 mesh with rise starch an added to charcoal streamer like tigertail.

https://youtu.be/mF0uhgG8LcE?t=2



#6 rogeryermaw

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Posted 03 November 2020 - 02:09 PM

to me this looks exactly like a firefly formula with aluminum on the finer side and a percentage of coarse charcoal in the mix.

 

 

the silver effect is delayed if you screen out the fine aluminum before mixing. tip from Mumbles to add to the surprise due to a delayed effect. but if you screened out and use only the fines from coarse flake aluminum, i suspect it would look just like the o.p.'s example.


Edited by rogeryermaw, 03 November 2020 - 02:15 PM.






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