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madarin crackers throw downs / adult snap crackers


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#1 dave321

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Posted 23 March 2020 - 03:48 PM

anybody got a workable process for making the above ?

 

they use a chlorate rp composition coated onto coarse gravel :o  :o

 

the chinese have got this down to a commercial process and are literally "banging" them out.

 

they produce a very satisfactory bang when thrown, but do not explode when dropped from ~90cm onto a hard floor.

 

a fine balancing act indeed


dave

#2 SharkWhisperer

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Posted 24 March 2020 - 09:29 PM

You're here with 300+ posts? Do you wonder why nobody's responded to your two threads on friction/impact-sensitive compositions yet? Sheesh, this is not top secret knowledge, but is probably also not a topic of open/public conversation, ffs. Torpedoes and their modern relatives are nothing new. Use your wits, man.


Edited by SharkWhisperer, 24 March 2020 - 09:33 PM.


#3 SeaMonkey

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Posted 24 March 2020 - 10:19 PM

When I was a kid these kinds of fireworks were readily available

They were called Torpedoes and generally came as a silver

painted balls about three quarters of an inch in diameter.

 

The Classic Work by Tenney L. Davis, The Chemistry of Powder

and Explosives has a section describing the process of how

they were made back in the day.  The book is still available and

is one that all aspiring pyrotechnicians, in my opinion, should

possess.

 

It is true that this sort of knowledge is becoming more and more

controlled by our society.  Public discussion is often frowned upon

as the topic nowadays is considered "dangerous" or "far right wing

extremist" in nature.  Times have changed.

 

They weren't available in Iowa where I grew up, but we could easily

get them by ordering by mail from Banner Fireworks Company in

Dayton, Ohio, or Rich Brothers Fireworks in Sioux Falls, South Dakota,

for freight delivery in Iowa; or we could drive down to Missouri where

they could be purchased an any fireworks stand.  Fireworks were

legal in Missouri but illegal in Iowa.  Even so, we in Iowa had no real

difficulty in getting anything we wanted.

 

Correction:  Banner Fireworks was in Toledo, Ohio.

 

 

The Chinese made "snappers" which are tiny pieces of gravel wrapped

in paper and twisted closed are a different composition, usually a tiny

pinch of Silver Fulminate in with the pieces of gravel.  Very tiny.


Edited by SeaMonkey, 24 March 2020 - 11:03 PM.


#4 dave321

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Posted 25 March 2020 - 05:27 AM

You're here with 300+ posts? Do you wonder why nobody's responded to your two threads on friction/impact-sensitive compositions yet? Sheesh, this is not top secret knowledge, but is probably also not a topic of open/public conversation, ffs. Torpedoes and their modern relatives are nothing new. Use your wits, man.

happy for the post to be moved accordingly, but technically the items are pyrotechnic.

 

also some stuff in davis is not totally accurate, and the sensitivity of some mixtures does not seem to be born out in practice.

 

commercial process for current manufacture by the Chinese are not documented, and for completeness this would be useful to add to the knowledge base, if any one knows.

 

your post was unnecessarily aggressive in nature and unwarranted, please modify your responses in fututre


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dave

#5 SeaMonkey

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Posted 27 March 2020 - 12:57 AM

This may be of additional help.

 

Or look here.


Edited by SeaMonkey, 27 March 2020 - 02:30 AM.


#6 dave321

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Posted 27 March 2020 - 02:36 PM

i already have the john donner's book, but the other references i will peruse at my leasure

thank you


dave

#7 Piccaso

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Posted 29 March 2020 - 10:25 AM

Thanks for the info. I wish people here could be more welcoming to posters and not try and attack and scold all posters.






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