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protection is a must !

breath toxic chemicals dangerous

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#1 Iceland

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Posted 03 January 2020 - 09:02 AM

I was wondering what you people are using or recommending. I used to always work with with p3 masks which: 

Filters at least 99.95% of airborne particles

they cost about 8 dollar a piece. 

 

but I have found it is not enough, I would recommend a full face mask because the fine aluminium and other chemicals act as little razor blades in your body they can't be stopped, also your eyes are absorbers..

 

https://www.amazon.com/Esska-Dräger-X-Plore-5500-Full/dp/B002MFGE92/ref=sr_1_7?qid=1578063610&refinements=p_n_feature_keywords_browse-bin%3A2796128011&s=hi&sr=1-7



#2 Piccaso

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Posted 05 January 2020 - 01:42 PM

I just use a respirator labeled for n95. I see no reason to go further than that for particulate issues. The reusable painting respirators work well also. Your eyes natural watering will wash away any dust unless a large amoutn gets blown in them. The stuff just floating in the air shouldn't be a issue unless you just not being careful as to how much introducing to it. Just spooning some from vessel to vessel shouldn't be a issue in my opinion. It is your body though and you are the one responsible for it so if this gives you peace of mind then it may be worth it to you.


Edited by Piccaso, 05 January 2020 - 01:43 PM.


#3 DavidSvennigsen

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Posted 05 March 2020 - 07:13 AM

Thanks for recommending this mask. I was finding some good masks. I'll try it.



#4 PyroCat

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 04:45 AM

New member but I've been reading here for years. What other PPE is recommended when emptying the ball mill of BP, and working with larger amounts of dry BP? I have been doing this hobby for a couple years but stopped a year ago due to safety concerns with my setup after hearing about a few accidents involving ball mills here. Now I want to get back into it safely but I am concerned about the safety of making black powder. Thanks for any help in advance. Mods- If this is not the appropriate place for this question then please move/remove this post. Thank you.



#5 Carbon796

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 01:10 PM

What is recommended and what is actually practiced can be two very distinct different practices. Based on individual comfort levels, and environmental awareness.

There have been the occasional BP/ballmill accidents. Most in hindsight, involved non standard mills and or non standard media. Don't try to skimp or get by when building a ballmill. Only use a tefc motor, only use hardened lead media.

Wear some eye protection, glasses or a full face shield. Which ever you choose, they should be adjusted or modified to fit well, and not be easily dislodged. Otherwise they will not protect you.

A really good dust mask or a respirator.

A long sleeve heavy weight cotton shirt, buttoned up fully. Preferably over a lighter, also cotton shirt. Don't wear any synthetic ( flamable/meltable ) based clothing/footwear.

Wear some gloves, heavy weight cotton, or leather.

If static electrical shock is an issue, be aware of it. Make sure you've grounded yourself, immediately before you handle your ballmill. Also a light misting of yourself and ballmill with an antistatic spray is farther protection.

Thats kinda a recommended minimum, I've seen some people wear much less, and others much more, to include. Full FD turnout gear, nomex undergarments, and full face motorcycle helmets.

#6 PyroCat

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 02:07 PM

Thank you for the helpful information for someone who is new to the hobby. :) What is the safest container to use for a ball mill? I was thinking a plastic container would have a potential static electricity risk for BP but not sure what else to use. I used the Thumblers tumbler before, but based on the design it seems dangerous, as it doesn't have a grounded plug and has metal threading for the 6 wing nuts to open it which could strip over time and get into the final BP. What's the safest container to cook charcoal in? I made it in steel paint cans before, but they would flake bits of steel into the charcoal when they heated up. Also seems very dangerous to have that potentially contaminating the BP. Sorry for derailing the thread but i'm still new to this forum so not sure where to ask this. Mods please move or delete if necessary. Thanks again  :)


Edited by PyroCat, 07 August 2020 - 02:28 PM.


#7 Carbon796

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 03:14 PM

The thumblers/rebel 5qt rubber lined drums are the best in my opinion. They don't seem to clump as much, and are vastly quieter than pvc jars. I believe some people have changed out the studs in them to SS. Mostly due to corrosion in humid environments. I've personally had no issues with the stock ones. The stock thumbles tumbler is under powered and slow for an efficient mill, but can work with longer mill times. Most serious hobbyist will end up building a custom mill or buy one.

The paint cans are usually galvanized. You usually have to " burn them out " first, and clean them. Thats the galvanizing thats flaking off.

#8 BetICouldMake1

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Posted 07 August 2020 - 06:04 PM

If the studs on the barrel bug you you can easily cover them with caplugs. But I don't see lead breaking off chunks of steel.

I won't comment on PPE because I'm the guy dumping my barrel in shorts and a t shirt (not recommended). Just stay away from sources of sparks. And wear a mask.

#9 PyroCat

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Posted 08 August 2020 - 02:14 PM

Thanks for the helpful safety recommendations for a noob like me. :)



#10 Mumbles

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 12:03 AM

Some will run a magnet through their charcoal or run it through a chute with magnets to get anything ferrous.  When cooking from wood of somewhat unknown sources there can be staples, nail, etc. in them.  This may give you a little more piece of mind. 

 

I've been through a BP accident.  Any amount of skin coverage goes a long way.  I'd recommend at least long cotton sleeves and pants. When emptying, some sort of breathing protection is also suggested as it can be pretty dusty. As Carbon765 alluded to, the best PPE is what you'll actually use. 


Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

The sky is my canvas, and I have 2,113 pounds of powdered paint in the workshop.

#11 PyroCat

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Posted 09 August 2020 - 10:02 AM

Some will run a magnet through their charcoal or run it through a chute with magnets to get anything ferrous.  When cooking from wood of somewhat unknown sources there can be staples, nail, etc. in them.  This may give you a little more piece of mind. 

 

I've been through a BP accident.  Any amount of skin coverage goes a long way.  I'd recommend at least long cotton sleeves and pants. When emptying, some sort of breathing protection is also suggested as it can be pretty dusty. As Carbon765 alluded to, the best PPE is what you'll actually use. 

That's a great idea to use a magnet.  :)  I will do that to remove anything that comes off of the cooker because I will be using pure paulownia wood from my property so i'm not worried about contamination from the wood. I will wear long sleeve cotton shirt and pants with leather or cotton gloves. Then I will wear a thick cotton hoodie over that and also use a face shield. Do you know what caused the BP to ignite in your accident? When I saw what happened to you, dagabu, and burrito it made me stop pyro for awhile because I realized that BP is more sensitive than I thought. I should have read more on here but luckily nothing happened to me, but if it did, it would have been very bad the way I was doing it.  :blush:  :wacko:  :excl:  Thank you for sharing your scary accidents on here because it probably saved me from the same injury or worse.  


Edited by PyroCat, 09 August 2020 - 08:23 PM.






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