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very snappy e-match


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#1 dave321

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Posted 12 September 2019 - 12:10 PM

ok,

so this one is beating me,

how do you make a very snappy e-match, see below

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=k-m8ydkQwxk

 

i believe it s lead free


Edited by dave321, 12 September 2019 - 12:13 PM.

dave

#2 Piccaso

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Posted 10 October 2019 - 09:48 PM

It  might be a dragon egg comp. That of course is just a guess.



#3 dave321

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Posted 11 October 2019 - 01:15 PM

yea, i'm trying that idea but it does'nt look promising


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#4 Piccaso

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 10:18 PM

What about a magnesium based comp. It reacts very quickly and snappy when combined with an certain oxidizer almost like a vitamin F mixture.



#5 dave321

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 04:46 AM

nah, I don't think so


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#6 dave321

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 06:01 AM

it looks like its a commercial product they are selling,

 

i'm gonna guess it might be a nano thermite, something like

 

nano aluminium and nano molybdenum trioxide, or even copper oxide


Edited by dave321, 13 October 2019 - 06:13 AM.

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#7 Piccaso

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 01:03 PM

Given the color of the smoke released I think we can rule out copper oxides. I would try a nichrome bridge wire with dipped in a mixture of KCIO4 and magnalum bound with NC lacquer you would need to be very careful while mixing this as it is a form of flash that is quite sensitive. There is also a potassium chlorate and antimony trisulphide mix you could give a go in a 50/50 mix and coat with epoxy or NC lacquer but again mix in very small quanities with all the precautions for the most sensitive flash and place it on a bridge wire.You could also try a sparkler comp on a piece of bridge wire but you would need to speed up the comp a little to make it faster.  Or you could look up the patent to find the actual ingredients and then work out the exact mixture yourself. Outside of this I am out of ideas. Good luck with it.


Edited by Piccaso, 13 October 2019 - 01:18 PM.


#8 dave321

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Posted 13 October 2019 - 01:27 PM

 There is also a potassium chlorate and antimony trisulphide mix you could give a go in a 50/50 mix and coat with epoxy 

 

Yes this works, but it is not what is being used.


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#9 biffo24

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 08:51 AM

Hi Dave could it be Armstrong's mixture like in Xmas crackers coated with something.B

#10 dave321

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 12:25 PM

i dont think so, it would be too sensitive to ship.

 

xmas crackers dont use armstrongs, they use a VERY small amount of silver fulminate.


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#11 memo

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 03:44 PM

ok guys , what are Christmas crackers ?



#12 patsroom

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Posted 25 October 2019 - 07:43 PM

A small rolled tube wrapped in holiday wrapping (think toilet paper tube). The two end slide the wrapping off in opposite direction with a small snapper charge that pops-crackles. Inside are small toys or gifts for the receiver of the cracker.



#13 Arthur

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Posted 26 October 2019 - 03:21 AM

https://en.wikipedia...ristmas_cracker

 

The motto/joke inside is always child friendly, the gift inside can be valued at less than a penny/cent to hundreds of pounds/dollars according to the source and the party hosts intent.



#14 dave321

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Posted 27 October 2019 - 12:39 PM

 my money is on nano aluminium and nano copper oxide


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#15 urbs

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 08:03 AM

might I suggest you look at US Patent US 3793100A, especially example 1

 

You can use KClO3 for even more energetic reaction.



#16 dave321

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Posted 02 January 2020 - 01:03 PM

i am aware of that patent

 

...................my money is still on a nano thermite type composition.


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#17 WRAITH

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Posted 13 February 2021 - 01:37 AM

This would "maybe" only work for a firecracker & wouldn't work for a rocket or any ignition started pyrotechnic device as it wouldn't ignite because an explosion extinguishes fires. I'm thinking that the composition in that video to be potassium chlorate/red phosphorous.

#18 dave321

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Posted 13 February 2021 - 01:46 PM

This would "maybe" only work for a firecracker & wouldn't work for a rocket or any ignition started pyrotechnic device as it wouldn't ignite because an explosion extinguishes fires. I'm thinking that the composition in that video to be potassium chlorate/red phosphorous.

 

its possible , but how would it be shippable ?

it would be too sensitive, so maybe no

 

bear in mind its not being used to ignite anything, but just to make noise


Edited by dave321, 13 February 2021 - 01:48 PM.

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#19 WRAITH

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Posted 14 February 2021 - 09:00 AM

Easy enough to make them yourself, lightly dab the strike side of a matchbox with a damp sponge, grab a sharp razor & scrape the phosphorous off & add potassium chlorate then mix in some nitrocellulose laquer or nailpolish & dip your nichrome in the paste then let dry. No need for shipping.

#20 SharkWhisperer

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Posted 14 February 2021 - 04:54 PM

Easy enough to make them yourself, lightly dab the strike side of a matchbox with a damp sponge, grab a sharp razor & scrape the phosphorous off & add potassium chlorate then mix in some nitrocellulose laquer or nailpolish & dip your nichrome in the paste then let dry. No need for shipping.

That flame will be nowhere near as hot as a metal-enhanced mix, but might be sufficient for assisting BP motor ignition. Picasso was on the right track in his earlier post in this thread. If possible, use water-free acetone to minimize wire corrosion/oxidation over time if storing.

 

And "snappy" is not always a good thing, though it might sound kinda cool. Many of the pyrogen kits for model rocketry use a plastic plasticizer instead of NC, and some folks redip in plain NC lacquer after a pyrogen/NC dip, to provide "protection". Both will contain/confine your burn and cause pop, but that'll do very little to enhance ignition. Plastic coatings actually risk inhibiting flame transfer between pyrogen and target, and NC coatings though flammable, don't burn as fast as your pyrogen (thus containing it) except at very high (gun chamber) pressures (but at least it's flammable...). Find  what works. For hard-to-light items like AP rocket motors (for example) the heat of MgAl burning goes a long way.






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