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First Rocket with Stars


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#1 Dorkmongoose

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 05:30 AM

This is my first attempt at making stars and attaching to a rocket

4 oz BP core burning rocket

1.5" header made per Skylighter spec. except I used a round disk plug instead of tying with string

Homemade dextrin

burst charge:  homemade BP with impregnated rice crispies (rice hulls not yet available to me)

chrysanthemum and veline blue stars

 

Stars were only semi-successful.  I can't make out the chrysanthemum.  The veline blue looks pale.  I will try another blue formula next. Constructive comments are welcome.  Thank you!

 

 

Edit:  to properly attach file

Attached Files


Edited by Dorkmongoose, 10 March 2019 - 05:32 AM.


#2 pyrokid

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 08:28 PM

Nice rocket! I saw some charcoal firedust in the break, but I bet you put more blue stars than charcoal stars! Veline system is optimized to share components, not produce the best color. The metallic fuel is increasing the brightness at the cost of color purity. Organic fueled composition such as pyro science blue  http://howtomakefire...o-science-blue/ should have a richer color.

 

Regarding the break, it's a matter of personal taste and objectives. Clearly the use of a paper plug instead of stringing resulted in a dump break instead of something more symmetrical. I will say that I've seen some Chinese rockets that have huge, thunderous, round breaks from only a bag of flash powder and round stars in a thin tagboard casing.

 

Looking forward to the next one!



#3 Dorkmongoose

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 05:58 AM

Nice rocket! I saw some charcoal firedust in the break, but I bet you put more blue stars than charcoal stars! Veline system is optimized to share components, not produce the best color. The metallic fuel is increasing the brightness at the cost of color purity. Organic fueled composition such as pyro science blue  http://howtomakefire...o-science-blue/ should have a richer color.

 

Regarding the break, it's a matter of personal taste and objectives. Clearly the use of a paper plug instead of stringing resulted in a dump break instead of something more symmetrical. I will say that I've seen some Chinese rockets that have huge, thunderous, round breaks from only a bag of flash powder and round stars in a thin tagboard casing.

 

Looking forward to the next one!

Thank you for the comments and the link.    I was hoping a veteran such as you would chime in, as I know my design leaves room for improvement. Minimally, I need to improve my launch pad, stick choice and stick application.   I  added extra charcoal to the delay portion composition of the rocket, in attempts to add a bit of charcoal tail.  I suppose this sacrificed height?  More Veline blue stars were used than charcoal. :)  I also did not prime the charcoal stars...maybe a mistake?  I had read conflicting information about the necessity to prime those.   I opted for a plug because I assumed the report would be less audible, given the location of launch (large field in a semi-residential area).  I didn't take into account this affect on dump.  I will experiment with stringing on the next one to see the result.  This week I plan to make a similar rocket with a Lancaster red formula (organic) stars recipe I found online.  Thanks again!

 

About the organic blue stars referenced in the link:  How does one determine whether to use water, alcohol, MEK, acetone to dampen stars?  Is it based on solubility of the binder(s)?  I assume parlon is not soluble in water, dextrin is.  What about red gum?    I have also seen recipes that indicate certain star recipes should be cut, rolled or pumped---or any combination thereof.  How is that best determined?  I'm using a homemade spring-loaded 3/8 dowel/aluminum star pump I made based on a thread in this forum.  Thanks

 

Edit to add question about moistening technique


Edited by Dorkmongoose, 11 March 2019 - 06:10 AM.


#4 pyrokid

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 12:11 PM

Certain binders are not activated by certain solvents. We know water activates dextrin, and this is the method of binding. If a composition contains dextrin, you may assume that water is the correct solvent in the absence of any hazardous incompatibilities. Mixtures of solvents (e.g. Acetone/MEK) may be used to increase the working life of the wet composition by reducing evaporation. Certain formulas may be incompatible with water and thus require a nonaqueous binding system. Red gum is supposed to be activated by alcohol but I've never tried it so I can't comment.

 

If a composition contains both dextrin and parlon, the operator has some discretion: water is the cheaper solvent, but acetone produces finished stars quicker. It may be easier to roll stars with water as the solvent rather than acetone. These factors all play into the choices that you make.

 

Regarding star production: It's again a matter of using your production capabilities to produce the effects you desire. Precise color changes and uniform spherical breaks are most accessible from round stars and shells. It may be the case that you don't own a star plate or some pressure apparatus, so cylindrical stars are challenging. I can certainly vouch for the star rolling capabilities of a small kitchen mixing bowl!



#5 Dorkmongoose

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 04:38 AM

Thank you for the advice on solvent.  I will have to research small-scale rolling of stars;  I had considered them out of reach for now as I don't have the necessary equipment.  Might you have a link to a discussion on using a mixing bowl to roll stars?  Thanks again! 



#6 dlking59

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 08:00 PM

For simple rolling of stars try this

1. put down a piece of wax paper

2. put your composition on the wax paper

3. put a piece of wax paper on top of your composition

4. put a wood dowel (of the size stars you want) on opposite sides

5. use rolling pin to roll over the top of the 2 dowels to get your desired star size ie 1/4" dowels for 1/4" thick stars

Crude but works

Try using a pizza cutter to cut the rolled stars


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#7 Mumbles

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 09:54 PM

I don't think you understand what rolled stars are dlking.
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Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

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#8 Sulphurstan

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 01:53 PM

Dlking, without any offense, these should rather be called cut stars..

#9 Maserface

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 05:31 PM

Thank you for the advice on solvent.  I will have to research small-scale rolling of stars;  I had considered them out of reach for now as I don't have the necessary equipment.  Might you have a link to a discussion on using a mixing bowl to roll stars?  Thanks again! 

 

https://youtu.be/VH9s0YFEbdo?t=331

 

This isn't necessarily small scale, but should give you an idea. With the right technique you can swirl the bowl by hand and get some decent round stars.

 

Alternatively you can make perfectly usable small stars by screen slicing them.  Roll out a patty of wetted star composition to 1/4" thick and flop it onto a 4x4 hardware mesh screen, then just push it through.  you'll end up with more or less uniform round-ish stars.



#10 dlking59

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 09:42 PM

My apologies for calling the above star method wrong. I was thinking of the rolling pin rolling.

Mumbles and Sulphurstan thanks for the correction. I learned something new.

 

#11 Sulphurstan

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Posted 14 March 2019 - 03:13 PM

No need for apologies 🤙🤙
Just being precise in scientific matters 😀

#12 Dorkmongoose

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Posted 14 March 2019 - 05:40 PM

 

https://youtu.be/VH9s0YFEbdo?t=331

 

This isn't necessarily small scale, but should give you an idea. With the right technique you can swirl the bowl by hand and get some decent round stars.

 

Alternatively you can make perfectly usable small stars by screen slicing them.  Roll out a patty of wetted star composition to 1/4" thick and flop it onto a 4x4 hardware mesh screen, then just push it through.  you'll end up with more or less uniform round-ish stars.

Thanks for the video link.   I'll look into trying this instead of cylindrical stars. 






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