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Cut rubber stars


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#1 Tim1877

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 06:12 PM

So I attended to make some cut rubber stars using Ned's method from skylighter I'm going to post recipe I used for red stars my comp was more like sand than rubber only thing I changed was I used alcohol to wet instead of acetone Attached File  image.png   125.95KB   1 downloads
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#2 NeighborJ

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 07:23 PM

Well? How did they turn out? Light one?

The acetone would dissolve the parlon and if too much is used it turns to a warm taffy like mess. It's difficult to get the solvent just rite.

Alcohol works well and yes it cuts like wet sand but when they dry, are rock hard and light easier than the acetone made stars. That being said, it still requires a larger quantity of RG to be used as a binder. 9% makes hard stars. There are other formulas out there which are more suited for alcohol solvent. The stars you posted are better used with acetone to allow the parlon to partially dissolve and be used to assist the binding.

#3 MrB

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 04:13 AM

The only change made was quite large. Rubberstars are bound with the rubber. The alcohol just isn't strong enough to cut that stuff, and you end up trying to glue your stars together with the redgum, instead of the parlon.
I'd switch back to Acetone, and use plastic bags, like Zip-lock bags, for the mixing, to avoid getting the mess everywhere.
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#4 Mumbles

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 07:20 AM

Using a 90/10 mix of acetone and alcohol reportedly can cut down on the stringiness that sometimes happens.  


Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

The sky is my canvas, and I have 2,113 pounds of powdered paint in the workshop.

#5 Tim1877

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 07:47 PM

Well checked my stars this morning and they were all mush so I put back in the bowl added acetone rollled them cut them and they turned out good
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#6 NeighborJ

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 08:30 PM

Excellent, we expect video.😎

#7 Tim1877

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 08:38 PM

Got to put a few layers of prime tomorrow but I lit a couple tonight they burn hot and nice red color
Tim

#8 Mumbles

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 01:06 AM

Some stars do take a few days to dry. That is especially dependent on how large they are and how much water is in your solvent.  It was probably nothing to worry about.  Glad you got them taken care of however.  

 

As an aside, I generally dislike acetone bound parlon stars.  Watch for an incandescent orange tail, which can happen.  I see it too often from acetone bound parlon stars, and also from clumpy parlon in stars bound with other solvents.  Probably depends on the source among other factors.  


Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

The sky is my canvas, and I have 2,113 pounds of powdered paint in the workshop.

#9 Tim1877

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 12:35 PM

Some stars do take a few days to dry. That is especially dependent on how large they are and how much water is in your solvent.  It was probably nothing to worry about.  Glad you got them taken care of however.  
 
As an aside, I generally dislike acetone bound parlon stars.  Watch for an incandescent orange tail, which can happen.  I see it too often from acetone bound parlon stars, and also from clumpy parlon in stars bound with other solvents.  Probably depends on the source among other factors.

Thanks for the advice mumbles its hard for a new guy like me to figure out which formulas are best for what there are so many different formulas for the same comps
Tim

#10 Arthur

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Posted 16 June 2018 - 01:58 PM

If I'm planning to use acetone in a 100+F environment, does it work as a solvent for parlon and is there enough time before evaporation to cut some stars?



#11 Mumbles

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Posted 16 June 2018 - 04:03 PM

I would wet them in a sealed container like a plastic bag.  Hot, dry climates dry stuff out fast.  Keeping a spray bottle of acetone around to rewet wouldn't hurt either.


Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

The sky is my canvas, and I have 2,113 pounds of powdered paint in the workshop.




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