Jump to content


Photo
* * * * * 2 votes

Brilliant Color rubber stars w/o Perch


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 Ubehage

Ubehage

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator - HE
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 459 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 November 2016 - 04:40 PM

These are some formulas by Ned Gorski, that I found on Skylighter. I have previously tried some of Ned's rubber stars, and they all performed exactly as he said they would.

Therefor, I will jump to conclusions and trust that these stars perform as expected as well  :)

 

Composition name: Brilliant Colored Rubber Stars.

Composition type: Star formula.

Creator of composition: Ned Gorski.

 

All these compositions must be wetted with Acetone, to dissolve the parlon and make it a nice chlorine-donor.

In my experience, these rubber-compositions works best when you cut them.

 

The Magnalium has no specified mesh. My guess is, that a finer mesh will give a better result.

 

 

Brilliant Red:

53% Strontium Nitrate,

19% Magnalium,

17% Parlon,

11% Red Gum.

 

Brilliant Green:

53% Barium Nitate,

19% Magnalium,

17% Parlon,

11% Red Gum.

 
Brilliant Yellow:
13% Strontium Nitrate,
40% Barium Nitrate,

19% Magnalium,

17% Parlon,

11% Red Gum.

 

Brilliant Peach/Lavender:

53% Potassium Nitrate (KNO3),

19% Magnalium,

17% Parlon,

11% Red Gum.


Edited by Ubehage, 24 November 2016 - 04:42 PM.

  • Col likes this

Blowing shit up is not a goal in itself. Seeing your device working the way you intended, is the greatest satisfaction of all.


#2 OldMarine

OldMarine

    Firebreather

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,270 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lebanon Tn
  • Interests:Interests? Everything interesting!

Posted 24 November 2016 - 06:09 PM

I use those comps regularly and all perform great with monocapa or BP+5% Si prime.
  • Ubehage likes this
Come on! Name one other hobby in which you cheer as your money and hard work go up in smoke!

#3 Col

Col

    Firebreather

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,152 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 25 November 2016 - 01:19 AM

Mix 70% green with 30% red to get a nice yellow, 75/25 also works. Cant remember orange without checking my notes, its either 65% red/ 35% green or 55% red/45% green. You can adjust the ratio`s until you get a colour you like.

 


Edited by Col, 25 November 2016 - 06:15 AM.

  • Ubehage likes this

#4 Lysdexic

Lysdexic

    Smelt the smoke

  • Full Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 25 November 2016 - 06:20 PM

About the Mg/Al particle size Ned [edit-not Ed] says:

"Note: Changing the mesh of the magnalium changes the star's burn speed. Mesh sizes from 60-mesh to 325-mesh may be experimented with. I suggest you start with about 200-mesh and work from there."

http://www.skylighte...ubber-stars.asp

 

I only comment because I decided this was a good way to start experimenting with colored stars. Ned also wrote an article on colored gerbs using a similar system to produce any color you'd like so I ordered chemicals to experiment with both as well as bp based stars, drivers, etc. I'm looking forward to the thaw or at least it being warm enough to be outside :)

 

[Edit] I'm sorry your post was from the "Red Rubber Stars article and not the Rainbow Rubber Stars. My bad.


Edited by Lysdexic, 26 November 2016 - 03:20 PM.

  • Ubehage likes this

#5 Mumbles

Mumbles

    Grandmaster

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,172 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Above You

Posted 28 November 2016 - 09:11 PM

Mixing red and green produced what are known as optical colors.  They trick your eyes into seeing a blend of the two colors.  As far as they go I like 62:38 green:red for yellow.  More green(70-75) is a brighter lemon yellow, while a bit more red like what I mentioned gives a warmer canary or slightly golden yellow   For orange I favor 45:55 green:red personally.  You can play between about 50:50 and 40:60 to get the hue you like.  I don't really like going much more red heavy than that.  It starts to get kind of red-orange which reminds me of bad red stars or calcium based oranges.  

 

I do use a different base formula, buell red and the equivalent green with BaCO3.  Different formulas might need a little different ratios.  They're infinitely tunable to whatever you like though.

 

As a side note, adding a little strontium to BaSO4 based "white" strobes turns them true white instead of tinged green.  


  • Ubehage likes this
Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

The sky is my canvas, and I have 2,113 pounds of powdered paint in the workshop.

#6 Wiley

Wiley

    Pyrotechnician

  • HE Qualified
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 599 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 04 December 2016 - 12:49 AM

Nice note on the strobes, Mumbles. Do you have a formula that you could share?


Enjoys salamis

#7 Mumbles

Mumbles

    Grandmaster

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,172 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Above You

Posted 04 December 2016 - 02:46 PM

Of course.  It's really nothing special though.  Here is a pretty standard whiteish strobe rocket fuel.

 

Ammonium Perchlorate - 60

Magnalium (-200 mesh) - 25

Barium Sulfate - 15

Potassium Dichromate - +5

 

This is normally bound with NC lacquer, but this or similar formulas have been bound with mineral oil and vaseline successfully as well.

 

All you really do is replace 1-3 parts of the barium sulfate with strontium sulfate.

 

Ammonium Perchlorate - 60

Magnalium (-200 mesh) - 25

Barium Sulfate - 12 to 14

Strontium Sulfate - 1 to 3

Potassium Dichromate - +5

 

I'm not sure I've ever seen it done with AP strobes, but I suspect you might be able to use similar color mixing tricks discussed above to make yellow or orange strobes as well if you included some chlorine donor to emphasize the color producing species.


Just so you guys quit asking, here is the link to the old forum. http://www.xsorbit2....forum/index.cgi

The sky is my canvas, and I have 2,113 pounds of powdered paint in the workshop.

#8 Ubehage

Ubehage

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator - HE
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 459 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 February 2017 - 08:33 AM

Mixing red and green produced what are known as optical colors.  They trick your eyes into seeing a blend of the two colors. 

I confirm this.

I took a handful of red and green stars, in 2 seperate piles next to each other, and ignited them. And the result was bright yellow.

It is indeed an optical effect, and not necessarily depending on how well it's mixed.


Blowing shit up is not a goal in itself. Seeing your device working the way you intended, is the greatest satisfaction of all.


#9 Ubehage

Ubehage

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator - HE
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 459 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 11 May 2017 - 05:34 PM

Does anyone know if these compositions, or some of them, may be rammed?


Blowing shit up is not a goal in itself. Seeing your device working the way you intended, is the greatest satisfaction of all.


#10 lloyd

lloyd

    Firebreather

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,813 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 11 May 2017 - 05:58 PM

Ube,

I've always "wet pressed" those, using an excess of solvent to make them into soft dough, then pressing them into molds (or tubes) at not much more than 'hand pressure'.

 

They always worked well that way.

 

('take a while to dry, though)

 

Lloyd


  • Ubehage likes this

"Pyro for Fun and Profit for More Than Fifty Years"


#11 redbullzuiper

redbullzuiper

    Pyromaniac

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 50 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 August 2017 - 06:54 AM

53% Potassium Nitrate (KNO3),

19% Magnalium,

17% Parlon,

11% Red Gum.

 

High in the sky it looks a bit `purple (lavender)` which is cool because its nitrate based.

Is there anyway to improve this lavender color so it becomes a bit more purple without adding KClO3 or KClO4?


Edited by redbullzuiper, 28 August 2017 - 06:55 AM.


#12 OldMarine

OldMarine

    Firebreather

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,270 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lebanon Tn
  • Interests:Interests? Everything interesting!

Posted 28 August 2017 - 04:07 PM

Maybe try a bit of copper oxide or oxychloride?


  • redbullzuiper likes this
Come on! Name one other hobby in which you cheer as your money and hard work go up in smoke!

#13 NeighborJ

NeighborJ

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 967 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pittsburgh pennsylvania
  • Interests:Rig welder, trecky, amateur rocketry

Posted 28 August 2017 - 04:35 PM

I've never had any luck getting a purple from a KNO3 oxidized star. You will have better luck adding a copper compound to the strontium nitrate star.
  • OldMarine likes this

#14 OldMarine

OldMarine

    Firebreather

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,270 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lebanon Tn
  • Interests:Interests? Everything interesting!

Posted 28 August 2017 - 06:01 PM

I missed the KNO3.... long day.


Come on! Name one other hobby in which you cheer as your money and hard work go up in smoke!

#15 redbullzuiper

redbullzuiper

    Pyromaniac

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 50 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 August 2017 - 12:56 AM

Ive got only some Copper (II) Oxide atm. Im going to try that this evening. How much Copper should I add to the Red rubber star.

#16 NeighborJ

NeighborJ

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 967 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pittsburgh pennsylvania
  • Interests:Rig welder, trecky, amateur rocketry

Posted 29 August 2017 - 03:49 AM

Copper oxide works well as a blue light emitter. +8% will certainly shift the color to a purple but it may need tweaked to your liking, it may require +12%. Experimentation is half the fun of this hobby.

Jason

#17 redbullzuiper

redbullzuiper

    Pyromaniac

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 50 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 August 2017 - 04:15 AM

Yes, thats what I like about the hobby. I tried the same with a blue color. But its just not possible to create a nice blue color with only nitrates as the oxidizer.

But I never though about adding CuO to this red rubver star. Thanks for that tip. Im going to try it this evening and will post my progress and video if it worked.

P.S. I just love purple stars, they look amazing in the sky ;) So i really looking forward to experiment.

#18 XMax

XMax

    Playing with fire

  • Full Member
  • PipPip
  • 11 posts

Posted 29 August 2017 - 04:18 AM

Ive got only some Copper (II) Oxide atm. Im going to try that this evening. How much Copper should I add to the Red rubber star.

I would try someting like:

43% SrNO3,

10% CuO,

19% Magnalium,

17% Parlon,

11% Red Gum.

 

Made some tests of this a while ago. Will se if I find my notes.


  • redbullzuiper likes this

#19 redbullzuiper

redbullzuiper

    Pyromaniac

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 50 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 August 2017 - 03:51 PM

As promised, here by my progress.
 
I tried a few different batches. Also the one @XMax suggested. However, that didn't burn purple, but more a lavender color. The same color as the Brilliant Peach/Lavender.
 
When lowering the Sr(NO3)2 in percent and adding the CuO, the percentage I took off from the Sr(NO3)2, I didnt get purple either. But more a Pink/Lavender color.
 
I decided to leave the Red as is, and just add 12% CuO. The result was amazing. A bright purple color was observated. I really, really like it.
 
Huge shoutout to @NeighborJ and @OldMarine. I wonder why Ive never came across this composition somewhere on the internet. I Literally have looked inside every database available :o
Never seen a purple color using only a Nitrate as primary oxidizer. So im really curious if blue is possible aswell. Tested alot on blue, never succeeded.
 
Here is the video I took in slow motion (Amazing!)
 

Edited by redbullzuiper, 29 August 2017 - 03:54 PM.

  • Ubehage and NeighborJ like this

#20 NeighborJ

NeighborJ

    Pyrotechnician

  • Donator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 967 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pittsburgh pennsylvania
  • Interests:Rig welder, trecky, amateur rocketry

Posted 29 August 2017 - 05:44 PM

Redbull, im happy that worked so well. It looks comparable to the fusia in the jopetes pdf. Was it difficult to light? I'm curious how well it will stay lit after a good break. Testing is not over but it looks like a winner.

I do know that it is possible to make a nitrate blue but all my attempts have availed me squat. I do know that this nitrate green listed above can be tweaked quite far into the blue side of the color spectrum but not all the way.

Jason

Edited by NeighborJ, 29 August 2017 - 05:49 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users