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My Titanium powder process first step


kleberrios

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Large bushings Ti grade 2 and grade 5 should be shredded before going to the mill cut because it is impossible to throw them into the small vertical mill . There in the courtyard 4 ton to be processed. Use the sander to detect if the bags I bought is not stainless steel because stainless steel is dificult generate spark and the spark if iron is red.

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oT7Uy6ezYgM

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I had to watch the video to understand. That IS A PILE of Ti turnings. Have fun! Edited by OldMarine
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I had to watch the video to understand. That IS A PILE of Ti turnings. Have fun!

Yes. These chips come from Embraer (Brazilian Aeronautics Company) which manufactures civil and military aircraft. The problem with buying them is that they only sell tons of this raw material.

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Well, I hope your "vertical mill" has sharp and fast carbide blades!

 

Titanium is ordinarily reduced to powder (granules or shards) by an abrasive grinding method, or by cutting; but in both cases, from solid blocks of the material, not from 'lathe curls'.

 

If you grind with a high-speed mill, you should do so in an inert atmosphere, or you might demonstrate the sparking capability of the Ti during the process, rather than only before it!

 

LLoyd

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I would think you should bleed inert gas into whatever type mill you plan to reduce that with. Something from the old days (before real life) says nitrogen is a no-go so maybe argon.
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Well, I hope your "vertical mill" has sharp and fast carbide blades!

 

Titanium is ordinarily reduced to powder (granules or shards) by an abrasive grinding method, or by cutting; but in both cases, from solid blocks of the material, not from 'lathe curls'.

 

If you grind with a high-speed mill, you should do so in an inert atmosphere, or you might demonstrate the sparking capability of the Ti during the process, rather than only before it!

 

LLoyd

 

Well, I hope your "vertical mill" has sharp and fast carbide blades!

 

Titanium is ordinarily reduced to powder (granules or shards) by an abrasive grinding method, or by cutting; but in both cases, from solid blocks of the material, not from 'lathe curls'.

 

If you grind with a high-speed mill, you should do so in an inert atmosphere, or you might demonstrate the sparking capability of the Ti during the process, rather than only before it!

 

LLoyd

A tungsten carbide blade may not stand the shock, and would loose pieces, due to their extreme hardness, besides being very expensive, and have a 8cm x4cm size would be very difficult to sinter at a density of 16g / cm³, which is the hardness of tungsten bits. The steel that is done the blades V6 is heat-treated steel.

Edited by kleberrios
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I would think you should bleed inert gas into whatever type mill you plan to reduce that with. Something from the old days (before real life) says nitrogen is a no-go so maybe argon.

The mill produces no fine dust to the point of burning, as soon as the powder reaches 40 mesh powder exits the machine through the sieve, but the biggest problem is the heat generated by the grinding. Ideally the mill be cooled with water, after passing through a heat exchanger.
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A tungsten carbide blade may not stand the shock, and would loose pieces, due to their extreme hardness

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Oh, please! Who said anything about "solid carbide"?

 

Your point is NOT well-taken about only 'fines' being an ignition problem. Any sparking between blade and Ti, OR sparking of the Ti due to localized heat as a piece fractures is enough to ignite thin machining curls of titanium.

 

I wish you luck, but obviously you don't need any help. So... good luck.

 

Lloyd

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A tungsten carbide blade may not stand the shock, and would loose pieces, due to their extreme hardness

-0-

Oh, please! Who said anything about "solid carbide"?

 

Your point is NOT well-taken about only 'fines' being an ignition problem. Any sparking between blade and Ti, OR sparking of the Ti due to localized heat as a piece fractures is enough to ignite thin machining curls of titanium.

 

I wish you luck, but obviously you don't need any help. So... good luck.

 

Lloyd

OK. What I just wanted to say is that carbide does not support shocks. Really titanium clusters is very dangerous when the chip thickness is thin. When the thickness is thick it has no such danger, similar to magnesium chips. A doubt? there is some carbide not solid?

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You've never heard of "brazed carbide edges" on tooling?

 

It's robust, inexpensive, and easily repairable when the carbide decides to crack or break its weldment.

 

LLoyd

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You've never heard of "brazed carbide edges" on tooling?

 

It's robust, inexpensive, and easily repairable when the carbide decides to crack or break its weldment.

 

LLoyd

Ah, now I understand what you meant. Wood saws are equipped with carbide teeth on the saw, welded by brazing. I have even made some carbide weld by brazing, to work on the lathe.

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