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Oxalate Red


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#1 Titanium

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 10:13 AM

Name of composition: Oxalate Red

Composition Type: metallic
Creator: Titanium
Color/Effect: A nice and strong red with a good flame envelope
The Composition: (by weight):

Sr(NO3)2 - 30

Mg - 25

Strontium Oxalate - 20

Parlon - 15

 

Precedure/Preparation: Bind with Aceton and cut into desired size

 

My camera made the flame looking orange, but in real it is a nice, strong red as you can see in the background ;)

uj8i2fev.png


Edited by Titanium, 12 February 2015 - 10:14 AM.

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#2 schroedinger

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 03:27 AM

Did you use coated mg? No trouble with mg / oxalat reaction?

#3 Titanium

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Posted 13 February 2015 - 05:33 AM

No I didn't use coated Mg, because I read that oxalate is able to destroy Linseed coating on Mg.
I thought about coating with dichromate, but I don't had any trouble, if the Chems were dry and the Stars were bound with aceton or alcohol ;)

#4 Ubehage

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 07:37 PM

Did you use coated mg? No trouble with mg / oxalat reaction?

Can you explain further into this subject?

I'm very interested in which chemicals react with other chemicals, mostly for taking notes.

 

I searched Google for reactions with Mg and Str Ox, but didn't find anything other than it being an excellent red  :D


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#5 rogeryermaw

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 10:52 PM

Oxalates and carbonates among other chemicals we use can speed the reaction of Mg with water which then evolves heat further speeding the reaction...possibly to a dangerous point. a solution of potassium dichromate in water will react with the surface of Mg to passivate it against further reaction, leaving it safer to use in compositions. The leftover dichromate solution, however can be an environmental pain in the ass(carcinogenic). There are other methods for treating magnesium but none of them are a cure all. There are some issues with aluminum along these lines as well. An odor of rotten eggs (hydrogen sulfide) is an indication of such reaction occurring, but the remedies are different. Water used in aluminum bearing comps can be treated with boric acid to stop such reactions.

Edited by rogeryermaw, 24 September 2015 - 11:01 PM.

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#6 schroedinger

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Posted 25 September 2015 - 01:46 AM

Oxalates are a product from a strong base and a weak acid. The result is a salt which still has ph higher then 7. Mg js attacked in both acid and alkali enviroments.
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