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Self igniting candles, 99-100% reliable.


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13 replies to this topic

#1 50AE

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:00 PM

Hi there guys, haven't been here since long time. How are you?

 

I have to make some candles ignite remotely for a spectacle of a dear friend of mine. She will dance with a tray with the candles lit. There are 7 of them and they have to light together in the same moment. I have the remote control, I can handle the electronics, but I've never done this and I'm the research of "the best way to do it". So I'd like to address to someone of you who have had the chance to do practice this with a  very high reliability method. The ideas that come to my mind are:

 

1. Classic firework electric igniters near the wick and a drop of a flammable but not much volatile liquid dropped on the wick.

2. The same with the igniter near the wick,  but with flash paper around the wick (I have to synthesize it and I don't think I have time).

3. A heating element around the wick, but something reliable and fast. Maybe some nichrome wire and all the candles connected together in series via a LM317 current source.

 

I cannot think in this moment of something else :D

 

P.S. There's this guy to whom I paid 5$ for his pdf file instructions a bit before X-mas, but he turned to be an a*****e. I still haven't received my pdf.

http://www.magicnook...htingCandle.htm


Edited by 50AE, 08 January 2014 - 06:04 PM.


#2 dan999ification

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:05 PM

Hope all is well 50.

I have seen this done on a forum in the last few years, it may take a few days but I'll take a look for it.

Dan.

Jolyon yenkis owes you 5$ he is a magician and can make money disappear :)

Edited by dan999ification, 08 January 2014 - 09:48 PM.


#3 Bobosan

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 07:23 PM

Using igniters will leave the candles draped in wiring regardless of the 3 methods used.  If this isn't an issue, a small swab of cotton soaked in an accelerent and placed around the wick could work.

 

There are butane powered candles that may be usable for your project or just core and pipe some real candles for butane.



#4 chemtech89

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 09:19 PM

I cant help much with the rest but I would suggest connecting everything in parallel if your remote can handle the load.


75:15:10

#5 dan999ification

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 09:46 PM

http://www.pyrosocie...of-fire-needed/

Dan.

#6 taiwanluthiers

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 07:37 AM

Mythbusters used a neon transformer to start fires...

 

They also used visco fuse to some smokeless powder to start a bonfire.



#7 dan999ification

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 08:32 AM

Neither are relevant nor practical for this application.
A neon sign transformer is downright dangerous to carry live or be connected to.

Check the link above it has a nice video of exactly what the op is looking for, fired on a low voltage wireless pyro firing system.

Dan.

#8 Arthur

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 11:46 AM

http://www.jmldirect...CFTHLtAodPU0A-A

 

lots of other LED imitation candles exist. They flicker nicely and work off practically no power so a small controller will start them on cue.


Edited by Arthur, 09 January 2014 - 11:47 AM.


#9 50AE

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 05:35 PM

I don't have time to go and buy the correct gauge of nichrome wire. But I succeeded! I made a very reliable pyrotechnic mixture ignition. I use smokeless powder, it works great. For more reliability, I use two grades. The first is flake, for small rounds, it burns fast and work like a preheat and prime. The second one is small 1mm2- 2mmpieces from artillery grade rods. I put 3-4 pieces around the wick. Then I pour a pinch or two of flake. It works like a charm. My friend doesn't refuse an aggressive ignition, in fact she desires it for an enhanced effect, because the candles will ignite in a dynamic moment of the music. 

 

One of the disadvantages of this method is that it isn't fast to reload and it leaves residue on the candle. But I don't have problems with these in this case. 


Edited by 50AE, 09 January 2014 - 05:38 PM.


#10 Peret

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 03:32 PM

"Artillery grade rods". Hmmm. Sounds interesting.



#11 Bobosan

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 06:16 PM

"Artillery grade rods". Hmmm. Sounds interesting.

 

Some of the larger calibre rounds use an extruded cylindrical NC grain.  I think Browning .50 uses this type.



#12 patsroom

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 06:28 PM

 This all sounds good, so I was thinking what about a large crushed chip from a black powder puck after corning the powder. Then lightly glue the chuck to the wick............Pat


Edited by patsroom, 12 January 2014 - 06:30 PM.


#13 dan999ification

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 05:51 AM

Are these military grade Rods nc or cordite?

I lit a small puck once, once you get under a few grams they start to fly :)

Dan.

#14 50AE

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 02:02 PM

These are military nc grade rods with a core in the center. One could play with them to watch them burn, but if it happens that the flame enters the core, beware :D. It goes into very rapid burning and the whole rod propels itself with a boom. It can be dangerous if there is someone nearby, it could stick out his eye I think.


Edited by 50AE, 15 January 2014 - 02:02 PM.





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