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Help Wiring This Washing Machine Motor


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#1 eddiegnz1

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 12:38 PM

Do you have any idea how to wire this thing. I have experience with wiring many things but I don't know which wire is for what on this washing machine motor. It's a Kenmore model 110.200.72993. It's a 3 speed direct drive motor. I live in USA so it's 110volt. Thanks !

Attached File  Specs.jpg   117.86KB   61 downloads
Photo 1 above is the sticker on the motor
Attached File  WholeMotor.jpg   294.95KB   87 downloads
Photo 2 above is the entire motor
Attached File  PlugMaleHarness.jpg   344.55KB   78 downloads
Photo 3 above is the wire harness pluged into the motor
Attached File  plugFemaleHarness2.jpg   376.61KB   56 downloads
Photo 4 above is where the wire harness plugs into on the motor
Attached File  plugFemaleHarness.jpg   195.4KB   47 downloads
Photo 5 above is another angle of where the wire harness plugs into the motor

Edited by eddiegnz1, 14 January 2010 - 04:49 PM.


#2 Miech

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 01:37 PM

It was a Wirlpool washer probably.

Concerning the wiring, there are many ways such a motor can be wired. This particular motor is a 2 speed one, and probably wires having the same colour are having the same function. A lot of washing machine motors have speed sensors, so you don't need the wires attached to that. Then find the wires that are attached to a coil, and measure the resistance. That will give you a little insight in the relative number of windings on that coil, so you can predict which are the high speed coils and which are for low speed.

If you found out which coils are for which speed, you can carefully connect one of the coils in series with a 100 Watt light bulb. This will limit the current in case of a shorted circuit and prevent blowing up fuses. Please note that it is very likely the other coil will produce current when the motor is connected. Also, connect the ground wire first if you don't like being electrocuted.
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#3 eddiegnz1

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 02:01 PM

I'm pretty sure now that the make and model is
Kenmoore model: 110.200.72993
I googled the motor part number and it came up with that washer (reverse referenced)

there is also a large black capacitor that is attached to the red wire.

Edited by eddiegnz1, 14 January 2010 - 02:03 PM.


#4 TheSidewinder

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 02:25 PM

One other consideration is the Duty Cycle of that motor.

I have no idea what it is, but if it's from a Washing Machine it most likely isn't rated for the length of time you may need to run it.

I'll let someone more in the know address that.

You'd be better served, I think, getting a nice 1/2-horse motor. There are a few examples posted here somewhere.
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#5 eddiegnz1

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 02:38 PM

These additional photos might help. I'm not entirely sure how to interpret this data. It is from the wiring diagram. I get a bit fuzzy when I try to digest it.

Attached File  WireSchemMotor2.jpg   173.9KB   36 downloads
Attached File  WireSchemMotor3.jpg   287.73KB   65 downloads

Ok i think i figured something out. The red wire goes to a capacitor and I'm pretty sure that's the one I hook up to the hot lead on my 3 prong house plug. Then the Green-yellow is probably ground. So if I'm right, it leaves one question, which wires to hook up to the neutral.
I want it in low speed which is 850 RPM (as you can see in the above photo, 1,725rpm is high, 1,140rpm is medium and 850rpm is low). In the following photo, it says that low speed is ( " W-BK to W-Or " ). So I'm 47% sure that either one of those wires should be my third and final connection to the 3 prong house plug. Based on the following photo, do you think that I should hook both those wires together to the neutral prong on my 3 prong house plug? Or maybe I just hook those two wires together (W-BK to W-OR) and then some other wire would go to the neutral prong on my 3 prong house plug?
Attached File  WireSchemMotor.jpg   42.89KB   38 downloads

Edited by eddiegnz1, 14 January 2010 - 04:03 PM.


#6 eddiegnz1

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 04:08 PM

It was a Wirlpool washer probably.

Concerning the wiring, there are many ways such a motor can be wired. This particular motor is a 2 speed one, and probably wires having the same colour are having the same function. A lot of washing machine motors have speed sensors, so you don't need the wires attached to that. Then find the wires that are attached to a coil, and measure the resistance. That will give you a little insight in the relative number of windings on that coil, so you can predict which are the high speed coils and which are for low speed.

If you found out which coils are for which speed, you can carefully connect one of the coils in series with a 100 Watt light bulb. This will limit the current in case of a shorted circuit and prevent blowing up fuses. Please note that it is very likely the other coil will produce current when the motor is connected. Also, connect the ground wire first if you don't like being electrocuted.

thanks Miech. I've edited my post to add some info i didn't have before. e.g. 3 speed Kenmore motor. So I actually found the paper that shows which wire is for which speed. But which wires do I hook to the neutral prong on my 3 prong house plug. See my other comments and photos in this post. thanks again Miech

#7 marks265

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 04:53 PM

The green wire is ground. I don't see a green wire. Assuming that the motor is good check for resistance of the wire to the metal frame of motor. If the measurement is infinity or a dead short then it is probably ground. The white wire is nuetral! Look at the resistance chart and you will see that "W" is always used for one of the two potentials (hot or nuetral). The hot wire is the problem wire. The capacitor is a start capacitor and is only used at motor start. There is a centrifugal speed switch that when the motor is up to speed the capacitor drops out of the circuit. A very bad thing here is that this switch is usually an open contact set (to air) and is not dust proof and is very bad for pyro use. I would verify that this is the case for this motor or not. I am sure that the danger is noted in regards to pyro dust and electrical sparks. Also this motor has open terminals and can carbon track to a dead short as well, setting aside the usual shock hazards of course. So do you still really want to use the motor???

I think it was the Sidewinder that mentioned that other motor are a better choice and I have to agree.

Mark


These additional photos might help. I'm not entirely sure how to interpret this data. It is from the wiring diagram. I get a bit fuzzy when I try to digest it.

Attached File  WireSchemMotor2.jpg   173.9KB   36 downloads
Attached File  WireSchemMotor3.jpg   287.73KB   65 downloads

Ok i think i figured something out. The red wire goes to a capacitor and I'm pretty sure that's the one I hook up to the hot lead on my 3 prong house plug. Then the Green-yellow is probably ground. So if I'm right, it leaves one question, which wires to hook up to the neutral.
I want it in low speed which is 850 RPM (as you can see in the above photo, 1,725rpm is high, 1,140rpm is medium and 850rpm is low). In the following photo, it says that low speed is ( " W-BK to W-Or " ). So I'm 47% sure that either one of those wires should be my third and final connection to the 3 prong house plug. Based on the following photo, do you think that I should hook both those wires together to the neutral prong on my 3 prong house plug? Or maybe I just hook those two wires together (W-BK to W-OR) and then some other wire would go to the neutral prong on my 3 prong house plug?
Attached File  WireSchemMotor.jpg   42.89KB   38 downloads



#8 eddiegnz1

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 05:05 PM

The green wire is ground. I don't see a green wire. Assuming that the motor is good check for resistance of the wire to the metal frame of motor. If the measurement is infinity or a dead short then it is probably ground. The white wire is nuetral! Look at the resistance chart and you will see that "W" is always used for one of the two potentials (hot or nuetral). The hot wire is the problem wire. The capacitor is a start capacitor and is only used at motor start. There is a centrifugal speed switch that when the motor is up to speed the capacitor drops out of the circuit. A very bad thing here is that this switch is usually an open contact set (to air) and is not dust proof and is very bad for pyro use. I would verify that this is the case for this motor or not. I am sure that the danger is noted in regards to pyro dust and electrical sparks. Also this motor has open terminals and can carbon track to a dead short as well, setting aside the usual shock hazards of course. So do you still really want to use the motor???

I think it was the Sidewinder that mentioned that other motor are a better choice and I have to agree.

Mark

1) There is a wire that is green-yellow (green with yellow stripe see photo). That G-Y wire was hooked up to the metal frame of the washer. So that must be ground right?

2) So if I want the motor to run on low speed, do I just connect the W-BK wire to the W-OR wire (i.e. White with Black stripe to White with Orange stripe)

3) So do I need the red wire at all (the one with the start capacitor) ?

4) which wire is the hot wire?

5) thanks for the safety reminder. I have a plan to ensure that chems will never touch the motor. It's a special custom cabinet that I will build to house the motor with vents for heat. Hard to explain but it will never allow chems to touch the motor. labor intensive but safe.

Edited by eddiegnz1, 14 January 2010 - 05:07 PM.


#9 marks265

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 05:30 PM

Can't see the complete speed chart table of switches when middle image is opened.

Mark


These additional photos might help. I'm not entirely sure how to interpret this data. It is from the wiring diagram. I get a bit fuzzy when I try to digest it.

Attached File  WireSchemMotor2.jpg   173.9KB   36 downloads
Attached File  WireSchemMotor3.jpg   287.73KB   65 downloads

Ok i think i figured something out. The red wire goes to a capacitor and I'm pretty sure that's the one I hook up to the hot lead on my 3 prong house plug. Then the Green-yellow is probably ground. So if I'm right, it leaves one question, which wires to hook up to the neutral.
I want it in low speed which is 850 RPM (as you can see in the above photo, 1,725rpm is high, 1,140rpm is medium and 850rpm is low). In the following photo, it says that low speed is ( " W-BK to W-Or " ). So I'm 47% sure that either one of those wires should be my third and final connection to the 3 prong house plug. Based on the following photo, do you think that I should hook both those wires together to the neutral prong on my 3 prong house plug? Or maybe I just hook those two wires together (W-BK to W-OR) and then some other wire would go to the neutral prong on my 3 prong house plug?
Attached File  WireSchemMotor.jpg   42.89KB   38 downloads



#10 eddiegnz1

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 06:01 PM

...sorry marks, try these
Attached File  bestLeft.jpg   584.17KB   20 downloads
Attached File  BestRight.jpg   697.37KB   24 downloads

If there's one specific area that you want to see, I can zoom in for a highly detailed and clear image. let me know...and thanks so much for your help

#11 marks265

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 08:04 PM

Well here is my best educated guess of an answer. No garantees because I don't have the motor in front of me to do any testing before appling power and things are easily missed. It is up to you to be safe. After wiring I would plug into a 15amp or more power strip and use that switch to energize motor. Also after wiring I would check resistance and compare to resistance against info shown on label. All possible and imaginable disclaimers apply! I still think a different motor is a better choice.

The green wire with yellow strip that is tied to motor frame we know is ground.
The white wire is nuetral.
110 volts looks like it should go to the orange terminal of centrifugal switch. This allows capacitor switching.
ALSO the switch configuration for low speed shows S1,S3,S8 should be closed. Joining the blue wire with an orange stripe to the white wire with a violet stripe AND a white wire with an orange stripe. This would be like closing S1 and S3. S8 is jumped out just by connecting the power to the orange wire.

All I can say is Good luck with this and wait to see if others chime in on my thoughts. :rolleyes:

Mark

#12 eddiegnz1

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 08:26 PM

Well here is my best educated guess of an answer. No garantees because I don't have the motor in front of me to do any testing before appling power and things are easily missed. It is up to you to be safe. After wiring I would plug into a 15amp or more power strip and use that switch to energize motor. Also after wiring I would check resistance and compare to resistance against info shown on label. All possible and imaginable disclaimers apply! I still think a different motor is a better choice.

The green wire with yellow strip that is tied to motor frame we know is ground.
The white wire is nuetral.
110 volts looks like it should go to the orange terminal of centrifugal switch. This allows capacitor switching.
ALSO the switch configuration for low speed shows S1,S3,S8 should be closed. Joining the blue wire with an orange stripe to the white wire with a violet stripe AND a white wire with an orange stripe. This would be like closing S1 and S3. S8 is jumped out just by connecting the power to the orange wire.

All I can say is Good luck with this and wait to see if others chime in on my thoughts. :rolleyes:

Mark

Mark, whether you're right or wrong, either way I do appreciate your efforts to help me. Now, let me know if you think I undersdand you by the following. Going from left to right on the molex I will do the following with each wire right?
1-Red, cap off to nothing(this is the wire that has the start capacitor hooked up to it)
2-empty
3-orange, hot wire on my wall outlet plug
4-white, neutral wire on my wall outlet plug
5-green/yello, ground wire on my wall outlet plug
6-yellow, cap off
7-blue, cap off
8-white/black, cap off
9-blue/orange, to white/orange & white/violet (all three capped off together)
10-empty

Is that what you're suggesting. I'm clear on your disclaimers and hereby release you of any liability.

#13 marks265

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 08:51 PM

Yes, this is what I am thinking. The red and yellow wire are used internal with the centrifugal switch and if I remember the blue was for other speeds. This is what makes it hard because "IT LOOKS LIKE" these are internal contacts that are onboard the motor. The yellow and red are connected internally this way IF my thoughts are correct they will come into play when motor starts to turn.



Mark, whether you're right or wrong, either way I do appreciate your efforts to help me. Now, let me know if you think I undersdand you by the following. Going from left to right on the molex I will do the following with each wire right?
1-Red, cap off to nothing(this is the wire that has the start capacitor hooked up to it)
2-empty
3-orange, hot wire on my wall outlet plug
4-white, neutral wire on my wall outlet plug
5-green/yello, ground wire on my wall outlet plug
6-yellow, cap off
7-blue, cap off
8-white/black, cap off
9-blue/orange, to white/orange & white/violet (all three capped off together)
10-empty

Is that what you're suggesting. I'm clear on your disclaimers and hereby release you of any liability.



#14 marks265

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 09:14 PM

Hey Eddie,

Check out this link. I think I got something wrong. This may be our answer.

http://applianceguru...rum2/15785.html

Mark

edit

oops this is not the same-never mind

Edited by marks265, 14 January 2010 - 09:19 PM.


#15 eddiegnz1

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 09:33 PM

someone in another forum tried to help me but they spoke the foreing language of highly technical electronics genius. They said the following but I just wanted simpler instructions like hook the red wire together with the blue wire and both of them to the hot lead of your wall outlet...can you maybe translate his instructions to wiring instructions for my wall outlet:

>The washer motor is a reversible 3 speed motor that uses the timer to do the reversing and also to determine the speed. The motor always starts on high and then drops back to the speed the timer has selected. Here is the easy part. For start, one wire will go to the capacitor, (leave the red wire on the capacitor that goes to the centrifugal switch) and the other where the yellow wire was attached to the motor. Reversing these wires will determine direction. A hot lead will go to where the Blue is attached if you want high speed and the other to where the white wire was attached. If you want a lower speed you still need a jumper wire to close the circuit the timer closed for us.

>you need to put one of the start wires with the hot BU lead and the other start wire with the WH. The easiest way will be to use the wire harness and connector from the washer. The green is already grounded on the motor and connects to your plug or wall ground. The extra plug on the side will not be used unless you choose to use a speed other than high.

>follow the wiring diagram you attached. The start winding is shown and the color wires that come to the motor match those of the washer harness and are what I referenced. The information I gave you so far is all that is needed to get it to run on high speed. To go to the lower speeds will be more complicated

So, by the above, does he mean to say the following:
1-Red, tie together to the blue and both of them go to the hot lead on my wall outlet plug
2-empty
3-orange, cap off
4-white, tie together with yellow and both of them go to the neutral wire on my wall outlet plug
5-green/yello, ground wire on my wall outlet plug
6-yellow, tie together with white and both of them go to the neutral wire on my wall outlet plug
7-blue, tie together with the red and both of them go to the hot lead on my wall outlet plug
8-white/black, cap off
9-blue/orange, cap off
10-empty

Edited by eddiegnz1, 14 January 2010 - 09:39 PM.


#16 marks265

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 09:57 PM

I like his last sentence!

I will look at this more tomorrow. Right now he and I are on the same path except I gave you my thoughts for low speed operation and he gave high speed. If I were to try anything different then what I first said, I would isolate the white with violet stripe wire OR white with orange stripe wire from blue with orange stripe. He also talks about using wiring that came from wash machine where I took that out to try to make it simple for you. Maybe post a pic of all the loose wire ends to give me an idea of the wire harness but the way I read the schematics it should not be needed.

Mark

#17 eddiegnz1

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 10:37 PM

OK, it got it to run on high speed. Runs nice. But now I would like to get it to run on the lowest speed. Here's what I did to get it to run on high. I left the molex (see photo) plugged into the motor and just cut the wires about 18 inches from the motor. And at that point is where I hooked up my 3 pronged wall plug.

1-Red, tie together to the blue and both of them go to the hot lead on my wall outlet plug
2-empty
3-orange, cap off
4-white, tie together with yellow and both of them go to the neutral wire on my wall outlet plug
5-green/yellow, ground wire on my wall outlet plug
6-yellow, tie together with white and both of them go to the neutral wire on my wall outlet plug
7-blue, tie together with the red and both of them go to the hot lead on my wall outlet plug
8-white/black, cap off
9-blue/orange, cap off
10-empty

The second smaller molex was unused with each of its two wires capped off separately.

So how would I get it to run on the lowest of the 3 speeds?

Edit this post:
I haven't tried it yet but I was just told in another forum that to run on low I simply do the above but replace the blue with the White/orange.

Edited by eddiegnz1, 15 January 2010 - 07:33 AM.


#18 eddiegnz1

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 12:59 PM

Here's the final answer. This motor (model # 8314869) is used in various washing machines. The wiring diagram is not for the Kenmore 110.200.72993. My specific motor was not out of that washer (I thought it was). But that makes no diference because the motor schematic is right for the motor. So here's what you do to plug this motor into the wall.

1-Red, tie together to the blue and both of them go to the hot lead on the wall outlet plug (hot is typically black on the 3 prong plug USA)
2-empty
3-orange, cap off
4-white, tie together with yellow and both of them go to the neutral wire on my wall outlet plug (neutral is typically white on the 3 prong plug USA)
5-green/yellow, to ground wire on my wall outlet plug (typically green)
6-yellow, tie together with white (#4 above) and both of them go to the neutral wire on my wall outlet plug
7-blue, tie together with the red (#1 above) and both of them go to the hot lead on my wall outlet plug (this blue wire is used if you want medium speed of 1,140rpm
8-white/black, cap off
9-blue/orange, cap off
10-empty

The second smaller molex plug has the following:
1-White/orange, cap this off (unless you want the lowest speed (850rpm)) if you want 850rpm you use this instead of blue (so you'd cap off blue instead))
2-white/violet, cap this off (unless you want the highest speed (1,725rpm)) if you want 1,725rpm you use this wire instead of blue (so you'd cap off blue instead))

Safety is a big issue with this set up. This motor sparks and can cause fire/explosion with firework chems/comps. You must come up with a way to eliminate this risk.
Thanks to all that helped.

#19 Arthur

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 01:40 PM

A motor with internal switches is a poor choice for pyro. The Chinese have a way of sorting this - they put the motor in the next room and push a shaft through the wall.

See a current thread about a ball mill explosion. We don't want you to be next.

#20 marks265

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 04:37 PM

Glad to hear you got it going. Assuming this will be enclosed with no visible fan on motor for cooling, I am guessing you have a small fan in mind. Just keep an eye on it of course. I would still look for a better choice of a motor. I had a light fixture in my house last week with a loose connection. I could smell the wires frying but did not know where from at first. It was a scary feeling. I wouldn't want that smell close to pyro!




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