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A Lesson In Safety! Could have been worse.


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#61 starxplor

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Posted 07 February 2017 - 11:10 PM

Llyod, I currently work in a radiology dept. of a hospital (as IT), and the radiologists always call me to come take a look when a pyro related injury shows up. I was surprised we only had one major injury over the 4th of July holiday period.

 

One of the radiologists is also a member of my small group buy, so we get to talk about pyro every time he is on shift, heh.



#62 lloyd

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 06:03 AM

Neat!  My company did patient records, patient billing, and (oddly-enough) iso-dose calculations for radiation therapy. (so you can figure out how long ago THAT was! <grin>)

 

Lloyd


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#63 sitas

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 10:02 PM

At the on set off this thread it sounded like he was ramming a  bp motor.If by chance he gathered enough loose powder in the female part of the ram that it  bottomed out on the guide pin, could the heavy compression of the hammer striking the ram have caused ignition. I don't know if this is possible or not. I'd rather take some ones word for it than to try a test myself. I't easier to ask.


Edited by sitas, 08 February 2017 - 10:04 PM.


#64 lloyd

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 06:18 AM

Shrug... I guess it could.  You can't account for all the bad things that can happen from 'casual' use of tools.  When using a hollow rammer, two things should be the case:

 

1) the rammer should have a 'relief hole' at the top of its bore, to help prevent that very sort of thing, and

2) the operator should be inspecting the tool EVERY time before it's inserted in the mold.

 

Lloyd


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#65 sitas

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 10:08 AM

Lloyd , thank you for the come back. The very fact that it could be possible  will make me  approach things with more thought. As an older guy ,I can see where complacency creeps in . The old saying, familiarity breeds contempt," I crossed those tracks a million times and never seen a train ", Oh ya.



#66 lloyd

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 10:56 AM

FWIW, a relief hole just drilled it diametrically at the top of the bore helps a LOT, but one drilled at about a 45-degree angle from vertical (high on the outside of the rod, lowest where it intersects the bore) will do a lot more to keep the bore of the rod clean.

 

With the angled hole (larger than the pintle bore), any powder forced up into the relief tends to remain loose, rather than being compacted.  It then usually tends to just drop back out when the rod is removed from the mold.

 

We pressed dozens of different tube-items at the shop, including some 'cored' devices, like what are being discussed.  The angled hole allowed some of that to be automated with NO (zero!) failures due to the press-rod clogging-up.  We had a very few damaged core pintles  (but no explosions, thank goodness!) when we were using a diametral hole, which is why we changed to the angled one.

 

Lloyd


Edited by lloyd, 09 February 2017 - 10:57 AM.

"Pyro for Fun and Profit for More Than Fifty Years"





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