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Military flash fact or fiction


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#1 wyzard10

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 03:07 PM

     This is more of a chemistry question than anything else.  I have run across several quotes that state that you can completely fill salute casings with the "military" flash composition.  Conventional wisdom on all other compositions is to leave some space.  On the surface it would seem that the reactions would generally be the same with similar compositions.  Is there something in the added chems from standard flash that would prevent or minimise blowout with the military formula?  Or is this an example of internet BS.

 

 



#2 Mumbles

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 03:32 PM

You can completely fill the casing with basically any flash powder.  The "conventional wisdom" you see regularly is the actual internet BS.  Completely full is the best way for certain applications like hand rolled bottom shots and salute inserts.   Air space leaves the casing more compressible.  


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#3 lloyd

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 03:52 PM

To add to what Mumbles just said: "Military" flash powder is - um - flash powder.  I happen to have been involved with the military for the last three years on a project for a device that, among other things, contains flash powder.  They have two or three formulae most-favored, but they're identical to the same two or three formulae popular in the fireworks trade and in amateur fireworks.

 

The only thing that makes any particular formulae 'military' is that they have been codified in Mil-Specs.  That only means 1) that they've been selected by the military for use, and 2) you must use them for products containing it, unless you're willing to submit to a new qualification process for a new "Mil-Spec" powder.  (which you really don't want to do, if you don't have to!).

 

Lloyd


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#4 OldMarine

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 04:44 PM

I figured "Military Flash" was just regular flash with a quadrupled price tag.


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#5 wyzard10

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:23 PM

Ok thanks for the info, interesting to know where the "real" BS lies.






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