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What did you do today in pyro?


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#621 OldMarine

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 07:52 AM

The bench is very sturdy although it had some pressed board parts. I really like the vise on the side.
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#622 lloyd

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 08:02 AM

When those first came out, they had a 'super deal' on them.  I got three at  $99 each, in order to make an approximately-square large layout table.

 

I left out the glue fastening the legs to the tops, so I may disassemble and store individual ones on the wall, when I don't need the whole work area.

 

They are not as "strong as they look", because the edges are MUCH thicker than the top-deck, but they are plenty strong-enough for any kind of layout or pasting work... just not for 'pounding' work.

 

Lloyd



#623 OldMarine

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 12:23 PM

Cutting/pasting paper and shell assembly is all I plan on using it for but I'm sure it'll be used for other stuff just like all my other stuff!
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#624 Sulphurstan

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 03:08 PM

Made a burn test of my first willow charcoal BP, and yes! The difference with pine charcoal is remarquable. I wouldnt believe it much until making it by myself! It is worth the work of making the charcoal myself, ballmilling it with the sulfur, mixing it with kno3, precipitating with cia method, drying, granulating....
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#625 Ubehage

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 07:25 PM

Made a burn test of my first willow charcoal BP, and yes! The difference with pine charcoal is remarquable. I wouldnt believe it much until making it by myself! It is worth the work of making the charcoal myself, ballmilling it with the sulfur, mixing it with kno3, precipitating with cia method, drying, granulating....

Nice to know about the willow charcoal. I might try it some day  :)

 

On another note, you will also get better BP if you mill the KNO3 with the other ingredients.

If you worry about the hazard of having a drum full of explosives, you can also mill the KNO3 seperately before mixing as usual.

 

The CIA-method is said to lower the overall quality of BP, due to some KNO3 being "lost" in the water. As someone who started with the CIA-method myself, I confirm that.

It's better to use less water and a little more work. I use 20% water with 10% dextrin. That equals to 2% dextrin in the final composition.

Here's a helpful example of how to wet BP with less water, by Bangkok Pyro:


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#626 OldMarine

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 07:48 PM

Love Paul's videos!


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#627 Sulphurstan

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 08:18 AM

Nice to know about the willow charcoal. I might try it some day  :)

 

On another note, you will also get better BP if you mill the KNO3 with the other ingredients.

If you worry about the hazard of having a drum full of explosives, you can also mill the KNO3 seperately before mixing as usual.

 

The CIA-method is said to lower the overall quality of BP, due to some KNO3 being "lost" in the water. As someone who started with the CIA-method myself, I confirm that.

It's better to use less water and a little more work. I use 20% water with 10% dextrin. That equals to 2% dextrin in the final composition.

Here's a helpful example of how to wet BP with less water, by Bangkok Pyro:

Ubehage,

 

Regarding the mixing of the 3 ingerdients together, I did it and result is obviously very satisfying, but I'm still not confident, when I read what happened to some experienced members of this forum with BP ball milling, I try to get the best out milling C and S on one side, and kno3 on the other side.

 

Thank you for the video of bangkokpyro, i'll definitevely have a look! I was really thinking about the fact of loosing some kno3 in the water absorbed by the iso propanol (if I understand right, what you mean), and your post just confirm my doubts.

 

Anyway, I guess I've reached a good level of burn rate for my needs with BP. (needs some more testing and repeatability to confirm)



#628 lloyd

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 09:16 AM

First, let me say that almost all ball milling accidents have been caused by one of two primary 'diversions' from what we've collectively decided to be "normal practice".  I've been (shall we say) rather deeply involved in ball milling since 1992. <grin>

 

1) Folks have (rarely) used sparking milling media; stones, steel (other than stainless steel alloys), and some ceramics are known to have caused accidents.

2) Most such accidents have been caused by "process greed"... trying to get as much ground in one step as possible.  The large-diameter mill jars and heavy media they've used have increased the milling forces to the point where ignition was probable; and it's happened that way a number of times.

 

With milling jars under 10" in diameter, and with lead media, such accidents have rarely occurred.  If the mill is in a 'safe' location - barricaded and away from dwellings and process areas - then the only loss was the mill and/or its jar.

 

Properly done, ball milling is a "relatively safe" procedure, even on the full mixture.

 

Now... that said, David Forster has done extensive experiments with ball milling non-explosive mixtures, then combining them after milling.  He's had VERY good success with the method, obtaining powders stronger and faster than stock Goex powders.

 

You do yourself a great disservice if you do not read his posts.  I believe he goes by "DavidF" here.

 

Lloyd


Edited by lloyd, 17 February 2017 - 09:20 AM.

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